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Training Your Inner Fireman

HIIT Methods: Jacob’s Ladder

At one time, we could all crawl and we did it very well.  An infant develops the strength and coordination necessary to stand upright and walk by crawling.  The reciprocal arm/leg crawl pattern of the Jacob’s Ladder helps restore joint stability, coordination, and balance.  All of us have established neural pathways for crawling.  They are just cluttered up and inhibited by prior injuries, poor posture, bad training habits, and a sedentary lifestyle.  Performing some Jacob’s Ladder intervals will bring those pathways back to life.

The Jacob’s Ladder is a 40 degree inclined total body conditioning activity.  The ladder is self-propelled, and your position on the ladder sets the pace of the climb.  Wrap the belt around your waist with the emblem set over the side of your right hip.  Adjust the white section of the strap so that it matches your height.  Step onto the ladder and start climbing.  Initially, place the hands on the side rails and get use to climbing with just the legs.  Once you get comfortable with the stride pattern, progress to using the hands on the rungs.  Work on improving your coordination and form during the initial Jacob’s Ladder sessions.  When you are ready to stop, simply ride the ladder to the bottom and the ladder will stop.  Listed below are some of the HIIT sessions that work well with the Jacobs Ladder.

Five Climbs
Pick a distance, 100-200 feet works well for most fitness clients.  Start the stopwatch and climb 100-200 feet and  then rest.  Repeat four more times and record your time to complete five climbs of 100-200 feet.

50 feet / 20 seconds rest
Climb fifty feet at a fast pace.  Rest twenty seconds and repeat.  Repeat for a total of six intervals.

Ladder Ladders  
This routine will help you develop better endurance.  Climb 100 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 200 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 300 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 400 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 500 feet and rest 60 seconds.  If you feel strong enough, climb back down; 400-300-200-100 feet.

Save My Baby Sprints
You are the fireman.  The building is on fire and the lady with the baby is at the window of the high rise.  Hold onto the side rails and sprint up to that baby in the window 200 feet up.  Rest 30 seconds and then go get another baby.  Your job is to save four babies.

View video of Mike on the Jacob’s Ladder here: https://youtu.be/rqYz0tmPIc8

For more information on the many benefits of high intensity interval training, read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

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