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Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#7—Go Easy On Caffeine And Sleep More.

Caffeine is one of the most widely used drugs in the United States.  We consume it in coffee, tea, pop, energy drinks, and sometimes even in pill form.  We often consume caffeine to help us feel more awake and alert or to elevate our performance.  Often times, this is done in an effort to undo the lethargic effects of inadequate sleep.  Unfortunately, many people are sensitive to caffeine.  These individuals can experience increased heart rate and/or blood pressure which puts extra strain on the cardiovascular system.  All the caffeine in the world will not make up for the poor hormonal profile which results from low levels of sleep and eventually leads to decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass.  In addition, the stimulating effects of caffeine wear off over time and your body requires more and more to create the same effect.  It is far better in your 20’s to establish a sleep and waking routine that allows you to consistently get 7-9 hours of sleep each night.  The well-formed habit will then be easier to maintain as you age and adopt a more complicated schedule with work, kids, a spouse, etc.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#5—Get Strong.

Too many people (women in particular) place high priority on being “toned” and, therefore, funnel training time toward aerobic-based cardio activities like jogging, the elliptical, and group aerobics classes.  Any added resistance comes in the way of foam coated dumbbells, weighing less than most purses, for 2-3 sets of 12-20 reps, training primarily muscle endurance.  There are so many problems with this approach, but I will just touch on the most significant.  First, if your goal is to appear “toned,” the best way to get there is to have more muscle and/or less body fat.  The most efficient way to accomplish this goal long term is to build up your strength, so that you can do more work in less time over the coming years and decades.  The more work you can perform, the more calories you will burn, and the easier it will be to keep body fat off.

Secondly, real strength training (when you lift more weight over time) is one of the best tools for maintaining muscle mass, tendon/ligament strength, and bone density.  There is a narrow window in your life, which tends to peak out in your mid to late 20s, when it is significantly easier to build and maintain bone density and accumulate more muscle mass.  These tissues, by and large, need to last you the remaining 6-8 decades of your life so don’t wait to not have them to start thinking about them.

Finally, strength is one of the best tools we have for maintaining a high quality of life and staying out of a nursing home.  It might not be top priority or sound sexy when you are 21, but it will be largely too late when you are 61.

To hear Tom and Barb Doescher’s advice, see the video here: https://youtu.be/ce_n4ZF6HPg

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

 

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#5—Stay Mobile.

We’ve all heard the cliche “use it or lose it,” and when it comes to mobility, nothing applies more.  The human body is incredibly adaptable, and if you don’t regularly take your joints through their full range of motion, the ill begin to lose it.  Look at any infant or toddler and you will notice how mobile they are (though they lack lots of stability).  We all start off with this range of motion but many of us manage to lose it somewhere along the way.  Notice I said mobility and not flexibility.  Mobility requires that you can control your body through these full ranges of motion.  The best way to maintain mobility is to utilize as large a range of motion as possible when doing things like squats, lunges, push ups, pull ups, etc.  Also, try incorporating different rolls, crawls, and get ups to keep things moving and stabilizing properly.

To view a client performing a Turkish Get Up which is great for mobility, click here: https://youtu.be/bQl8P6YuGMw

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Turkish Get Ups and Waiters Walks

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.   

Turkish Get Up and Waiter Walk Complex

How you move says more about your fitness than how you look.  The pairing of the Turkish Get Up (TGU) and Waiter Walk is an exercise complex that improves gait mechanics and the survival skill of getting up and down off the ground.  You will be performing a TGU and immediately move into a Waiter Walk so you need twenty yards of open space.  As you get stronger at this complex and use a heavier implement, some interesting things start to happen.  You get better at controlling respiration and have an intense focus on how your body moves during the TGU and Waiter Walk.  My yoga friends tell me this is the focus of their practice sessions: better respiration, improved motor control, and increased strength.

Turkish Get Up

t_get_upsThe Turkish Get Up (TGU) is generally performed with a kettlebell, but you can use a dumbbell.  A medicine ball can help teach body alignment to beginners.

Exercise activities that produce the greatest rewards are the ones that take the most time to master.  You can learn a barbell curl in five seconds but a TGU can take weeks to master.  Developing proficiency with the Turkish Get Up will require some patience and instruction, but for the time spent, the pay off is tremendous.  Complete instruction on the TGU is not possible in this short article.  Watch the accompanying video and work with a qualified trainer on this exercise.  Steve Cotter and Gray Cook both have excellent YouTube tutorials on the TGU.

Waiter Walk

You must have adequate shoulder range of motion and good balance to perform this exercise safely.  Hold the kettlebell overhead like a waiter carrying a tray.  Keep the chest proud and the neck relaxed.  The upper arm should be adjacent to the head and your walk should be smooth and free of any lean or limp.

Complex
I like to train TGU rookies with a soft Dynamax ball.  If they drop the ball it will not damage any aspect of their anatomy.  Balancing the ball on the hand tends to teach proper alignment.  Progress to a kettlebell as you become more proficient.  Start on the floor and perform the TGU ascent.  Once at the top of the TGU, perform a Waiter Walk for twenty yards and then lower back down to the floor with a TGU descent.  Switch the implement to the other side and repeat.  Perform two trips on each side.

When you perform this complex, strive to move more gracefully before adding more resistance.   Get up and down off the floor and walk in a coordinated and efficient manner.  Only then increase the load of the ‘bell.

View video of Mike performing these exercises herehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0U9GWMI4bU&t=8s

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

PDFIn this month’s issue, Mike O’Hara, PT provides information on Achilles tendinopathy with exercises that will help prevent this painful condition. Watch the video for the exercises by following the link in the article “Achilles Recovery”. Mike also demonstrates and describes the combination of turkish get ups and waiters walks–paired exercises that can help you train efficiently. Video for this article can also be seen on our youtube channel; just follow the links in the article.

Download Here

 

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