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training

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#5 Training Volume

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#5-Training Volume

When referring to training volume, we are typically talking about one of two things.  Total number of sets performed in a given session, week, or month is one way to look to volume.  Another way to look at volume is as volume load.  Volume load is calculated as weight lifted x sets x reps.  So, if you lifted 100 pounds for 3 sets of 10 reps, your volume would be 3 sets, but your volume load would be 3000lbs (100 x 3 x 10).  Simply looking at volume (total sets performed) is a better way to compare different individual’s workloads.  Volume load is very relative depending on an individual’s training background, strength, etc.  If training volume gets too high, then you may be outworking what your body is capable of recovering from.  I find that most adult clients over the age of 40 struggle to handle more than 24 total sets in a single session or more than 72 sets in a given week.  There are some who can handle more than this, and some who struggle to recover from volumes half of this.  When increasing volume, it can be helpful to look at volume load for an individual and try not to increase by more than 5-10% in a given week.

Stay independent longer by increasing your stair climbing capacity.  Mike O’Hara shows you how in his article, “Keep Climbing”.  Mike also discusses standing desks and the many benefits of standing while working.  Jeff Tirrell explains the effect of exercise on appetite.

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Bad Man Break

Men Need To Be More Aware Of Bone Density

Allen was getting out of his fishing boat when he twisted his left leg and fractured two bones in his ankle.  Six weeks after ankle surgery, he landed in our clinic with considerable pain and a very limited lifestyle.  Allen reported lower back pain that he attributed to his limping and use of the boot on his left leg.  On recommendation from his physical therapist, Allen had further medical assessment of his lower back pain.  An x- ray of his lumbar spine revealed two lumbar vertebrae fractures.

On a recent vacation, Mike went on a horseback ride with his grandchildren.  During the ride, he developed pain in his upper back that “took his breath away”.  A visit to the emergency room with what he thought was a cardiac issue revealed a three-level compression fracture in his thoracic spine.  Further assessment showed significant osteoporosis in his hips, pelvis, and lumbar regions.  Allen started on some bone rebuilding medications and physical therapy.  It took over four months to fully recover from this injury.

Randy was working on his garden and fell onto the lawn.  He had right hip pain and was unable to stand.  His wife called the ambulance and he was diagnosed with a hip fracture.  Four days after the surgery to repair his hip, he suffered an embolism and at the age of seventy-one, he passed away.

All three of these older guys had testing that revealed a significant loss of bone density.  Unfortunately, the tests occurred after and not before injury onset.  We are getting better at keeping men alive longer–less smoking and better medications.  As men get older, the need to monitor bone density becomes a crucial aspect of healthy aging.  Men need fewer commercials for the latest in testosterone replacement and ED medication and more awareness of how brittle their bones can become.

The general public views osteoporosis as a “women’s health issue”, but management of osteoporosis is just as important for men.  Although men are less likely than women to sustain an osteoporosis related fracture, they are much more likely to become permanently disabled or die from the fracture.  Since 2008, the rate of osteoporosis related hip fracture in the American male population is going up at an alarming rate.

Osteoporosis is a silent disease.  Most people do not realize they have a problem until something breaks and they are in the middle of a medical crisis.  Even after a fracture, many physical therapy patients are reluctant to follow up with a bone density screening.  Being proactive is the only method of managing osteoporosis.

We know that individuals that participate in consistent resistance training exercises are more likely to have better bone density.  Just like muscle, bone is a living thing that grows stronger in response to the force that is placed upon it.  The best bone building exercise activities produce a stimulus through your skeleton.  Bone building exercises are easy to understand, but they do require more effort than swallowing a pill or having an injection.  Everyone can perform some form of bone reinforcing exercise.  Proper exercise prescription and consistent progression can work wonders.  See the trainers and physical therapists at Fenton Fitness.

Jane Brody of the New York Times wrote a helpful *article on bone density testing. It covers the latest medical guidelines for testing and the when and why of testing for both men and women.

Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

*New York Times, July 16, 2018, Jane Brody, When to Get Your Bone Density (View Article:here)

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#4 Carbohydrates

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#4–Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the primary nutrients that drive insulin secretion.  Insulin is an anabolic hormone that drives protein and fat into cells where these nutrients are used to repair tissue.  Though there are other pathways that do allow protein and fat to make their way into the cell, they are not as quick or efficient.  Carbohydrates are also stored as glycogen in the muscles, which is the body’s preferred fuel source at higher intensity exercise levels.  Carbohydrate levels can vary greatly depending on activity levels, goals, and training frequency.  Most people will operate best on a minimum carbohydrate intake of 100 grams per day.  Ideally, these are coming primarily from fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, beans, and whole grains.

Play It All

How To Keep Your Child On The Field And Out Of The PT Clinic

Taylor was recently referred to physical therapy with a painful shoulder and a right hand that frequently went numb. For the last five years, she had been a year round participant in softball. At the age of fifteen, she was missing out on softball and a good night sleep secondary to the pain and limited function in her right arm.

Andy played soccer, and at the age of thirteen, he developed knee pain that prevented him from changing directions and sprinting. Andy practiced or played soccer four days a week for 50 of the 52 weeks in a year. It took four years of year round soccer to create the knee damage that required surgery and an twelve week rehab.

Many of the young athletes we treat in physical therapy are the victims of over exposure to the same training stimulus for far too long a period of time. Gymnastics, dancing, baseball, soccer, and softball are worthwhile endeavors, but a developing body needs a break in order to stay healthy. This becomes even more important as the athlete becomes stronger or more skilled.

Take a moment and read the *article by Jane Brody in the May 7th, 2018 edition of the New York Times. Jane interviews several Orthopedic Surgeons that are treating younger patients with injuries that usually occur ten or fifteen years later in an athlete’s career. The research they present is clear; year round single sports participation is not the best way to excel in athletics or remain healthy.

The recent popularity of the club system has children playing the same sport year round. In the clinic, we are treating more young athletes with old person overuse injuries. Participation in a variety of athletic activities is infinitely more beneficial and safer than single sports specialization. It is no coincidence that most successful collegiate and professional athletes are the product of multi-sport participation.

*New York Times, Jane Brody, May 7, 2018, How to Avoid Burnout in Youth Sports. View article: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/07/well/how-to-avoid-burnout-in-youth-sports.html

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

 

 

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#3 Protein

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#3–Protein

Protein is responsible for making up at least part of every structure in all humans.  It is responsible for the repair of muscles, tendons, ligaments, and organs.  Protein is most commonly found in animal products such as meats, eggs, and dairy.  Despite popular belief, vegetarian dairy substitutes (such as almond milk) tend to be a poor source of protein.  Soy and pea along with a variety of vegetable-based protein powders are the best bet for vegans to increase protein intake.  For optimal recovery, protein intakes should range from 0.62 grams per pound of bodyweight up to 1 gram per pound of body weight.  For very lean individuals who are very active or trying to lose body fat, amounts may need to be even higher.  Protein intakes of up to 2 grams per pound of bodyweight have been studied and found to be safe in healthy individuals.

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#2 Hydration

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#2–Hydration

Hydration or water intake is probably one of the easiest ways to improve health, recovery, and performance.  For most people in the general population, we want to focus on calorie free fluid with minimum caffeine (this means water).  Water acts as a solvent, transporter, catalyst, lubricant, temperature regulator, mineral source, and assists in anabolic processes.  Water helps bring nutrients to cells and removes waste.  It is used in the production of proteins and glycogen, helps facilitate and speed up many chemical reactions (many wouldn’t occur without it.  It also lubricates joints and acts as a shock absorber for our eyes and the spine.  Water intake should range from 1 Liter per 1000 calories consumed (need to know your caloric consumption) up to ½ ounce per pound of bodyweight.  In very hot or humid conditions or when activity is very high, larger amounts may be needed.

Our June issue brings information on preventing neck pain by strengthening your neck.  Mike O’Hara describes and demonstrates in a video exercises that will help strengthen the muscles of your neck.  In another article, Mike tells how grip strength can be a predictor of early death in some patients.  Be sure to read Jeff Tirrell’s article on performance based training.

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8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#1: Sleep

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#1–Sleep

Sleep is one of the most neglected areas of health, fitness, and recovery.  It can have some of the most dramatic impacts on improving any of these areas, but can also be one of the most difficult areas to improve. We only have 24 hours in a day and we must divide this time between sleeping, eating, work, family/social time, leisure activities, and training.  Your priorities will dictate which areas you spend the most time on.  One thing that is often overlooked however, is that increased sleep (both quantity and quality) can help in many of these areas.  It has been shown that better sleep improves cognitive function (better function at work), makes you more efficient, improves mood (better for friends and family), improves hormonal profiles (better for health), and improves performance and recovery.  If you struggle to get enough sleep, try to set a better schedule for yourself to allow for earlier bedtime and/or a later wake time.  If you struggle with sleep quality, try to establish better sleep hygiene practices.  Common recommendations are to sleep 7-9 hours per night (kids need more like 9-12 hours/night).  However, some research suggests that hard training individuals may need 9-10 hours of sleep for optimal results.

100 Steps Per Minute

Step Cadence and Fitness

Exercise researchers have been studying gait cadence for years.  A cadence of 80 steps a minute is a stroll.  100 steps a minute is considered a brisk walk.  At 130-140 steps a minute, you move into jog or slow run.  Recent high tech evaluations of gait cadence has been able to predict the onset of dementia in older people.  For many people, walking is their primary form of exercise.  Gretchen Reynolds has written an excellent *article on the walking cadence that produces optimal health benefits.

A compilation of many studies has found that 100 steps per minute is the sweet spot for walkers under the age of sixty.  The data for older walkers has yet to be fully evaluated, but it appears a slightly slower cadence is a good goal.

I like evaluations of performance.  Evaluations tell you if you are getting better or getting worse.  The human body is in a constant state of adaptation and never stays the same.  Keep track of your cadence by counting your steps for twenty seconds and then multiplying by four.  Use that information to track your fitness level.  Ideally it should get easier to walk, at faster pace over a greater period of time.

15 x 4 = 60 Pokey Joe.

20 x 4 = 80 Still too slow.

25 x 4 = 100 Good job.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

*Walk Briskly for Your Health.  About 100 Steps a Minute, Gretchen Reynolds, New York Times, June 27, 2018

View: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/27/well/walk-health-exercise-steps.html

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