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Progression Know How

Hinge Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Hinge Patterns

KB Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps with 40kg (88lbs)

Single Leg Reaching Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with perfect form

Single Leg Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with 50% of bodyweight

Trap Bar Deadlift- Goal of 2x bodyweight (men) or 1.5x bodyweight (women) for 3-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: Hinge Pattern Video

Finding Fitness With Lower Back Pain

The number of USA emergency room visits, pain medication orders, injections, imaging studies, and surgical interventions directed at lower back pain continue to rise.  I frequently meet people who report their fitness efforts have been hampered by low back pain.  I have five recommendations that can help fitness clients with lower back pain have more success in the gym.

#1 Do not exercise first thing in the morning:  Ergonomic experts have found that many more industrial lower back injuries happen in the morning.  The theory is that the discs in the lower back imbibe or gain fluid overnight and are more likely to deform with a physical challenge.  Give your lower back one or two hours of walking around time before starting an exercise session.

#2 Isometric strengthening of the spinal stabilizers:  The function of your “core” muscles is to limit movement of the lumbar spine and pelvis.  Stop all crunches, toes to bar, sidebends, sit ups, seated twisting, and learn how to perform bird dogs, side hovers, Pallof press, planks, and carries.  Compliance with this single hint would reduce USA expenditures on lower back pain dramatically.

#3 Enhance the function of your hip flexors and gluteal muscles: Please cease all the forward spine flexion, toe touching, spine twisting activities.  Greater lumbar spine range of motion is associated with more–not less, lower back pain problems.  Learn how to foam roll and mobilize the hip flexors and gluteal muscles.  Prolonged sitting and most popular “cardio training” deadens these muscles.  Properly functioning hip flexors and gluteal muscles keep the pelvis stable and take stress off the lower back.  Reawakening dormant gluteals and hip flexors is the magic that resolves long term lower back pain.

#4 Focus on single leg strength training:  Ditch the front loaded hip hinges–deadlifts, cleans, snatch, and drop the loaded squats.  Swear off the lower lumbar deranging leg press.  Reduce spinal compression and train the legs, one at a time.  Single leg training reveals the right / left side movement asymmetries that drive lower back pain.  Resolving these asymmetries and sparing the spine goes a long way to abolishing back pain.  You will need some guidance on exercise selection and execution- this brings me to #5.

#5 Get some help:  Exercise is the most powerful medication on the planet.  Nothing else comes close.  Take the proper dose of appropriate training and the results will be amazing.  Take the wrong dose of an inappropriate activity and the results can be devastating.  This is especially true for people with a history of lower back pain.  Find a qualified physical therapist to guide you through your fitness journey.  One way or the other, you are going to spend time and money on your health.  Proactive spending is always cheaper and more beneficial than reactive spending.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

 

Progression Know How

Squat Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Squat Patterns:

Goblet Box Squat- Goal is 50% body weight down to a 12” box for 10 reps (if under 5’2” go to 10”, if over 6’ 2” go to 14” box)

Goblet Split Squat- Goal is 50% body weight for 10 reps/leg

Rear Foot Elevated Goblet Split Squat- Goal is 50% body weight for 10 reps/leg

Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat w/DBs at sides- Goal of 100% body weight for 10 reps/leg

One Leg Squat- Goal of 25% body weight down to 12” box for 5/leg (shorter or taller based off goblet box squat standards)

Front Squat- Goal of bodyweight for 10 reps

BB Back Squat- Goal of 1.5x bodyweight (women) or 2x bodyweight (men) for 2-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: https://youtu.be/vkrtWkNx8pg.

Be Happy and Feel Good

Watch The Ted Takj by Dr. Stephen Ilardi

The number of Americans with depression has increased dramatically over the last ten years.  Depression is usually managed with medications and at present, one in five Americans is taking an antidepressant medication.  A modality of depression treatment that is often overlooked is exercise.  Daily movement has a restorative effect on brain health.  For decades, we have known that bed rest, induced by illness or injury, can change our physiology in a fairly short amount of time.  A sedentary lifestyle can have just as big an impact on how the brain functions.  Take the time to watch Stephen Ilardi PhD *Ted Talk on the management of depression.  If you have the time read the **article he wrote in the October 26, 2017 issue of the Wall Street Journal.  Dr. Ilardi has some insight on how technology enhancements are making us unhappy.

Consistent exercise restores brain health, immunizes us from depression, and greatly reduces pain.  Physical therapy patients and fitness clients frequently say the most beneficial aspect of a renewed devotion to exercise is the improvement in their mood.  Hundreds of studies have demonstrated the positive effects exercise has on brain chemistry.  All of the happiness and pain suppressing molecules antidepressant medications attempt to increase are developed and maintained sooner and stronger with exercise.  Mood improving serotonin, dopamine, and BDNF–Miracle Gro for you neurons–all increase with exercise.  Some of the most revealing research on pain science has shown that the brains “pain circuitry” changes when a patient is depressed.  Pain is perceived as more intense, widespread, and emotionally challenging.  Now put down your iphone and watch Dr. Ilardi.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

*TedxEmory, Dr. Stephen Ilardi.  See the ted talk on youtube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drv3BP0Fdi8

**Wall Street Journal, Why Personal Tech Is Depressing, Dr. Stephen Ilardi, October 26, 2017.

In the January 2018 issue, Mike O’Hara focuses on strengthening your hamstrings.  Exercises to make your hamstrings stronger, not longer are given along with video demonstration.  Jeff Tirrell tells us how to make incremental changes in our diets to see positive changes, and the spotlight is on Fenton Fitness member, Robin Forstat–a nationally ranked power lifter.
Download Here

Modern medicine has lengthened our lives, but unfortunately, many older people physically deteriorate to a level that makes them vulnerable to minor health setbacks.  Frailty is a syndrome marked by weakness, poor mobility, a slow gait, and excessive fatigue.  Frail individuals are unable to adequately recover from physical activity or a challenge to their health.  Minor illnesses send them to the hospital, nursing home, or assisted living center.  Frail individuals are often unable to tolerate beneficial medical procedures and must live with pain and physical restrictions.  Frailty is a problem that responds very well to treatment.

In the 65 year old plus population, frailty syndrome is common.  Fifteen percent of the non-nursing home population is frail and forty five percent is pre-frail.  Frail individuals are far more likely to fall.  Forty percent of the frail and twenty two percent of the pre-frail individuals are hospitalized every year.  Frailty is a marker for adverse health outcomes and a means of identifying opportunities for intervention in patient care.

Physical activity has been shown to be the best preventative and treatment for frailty.  Patients bounce back from surgery much better if they under take a program of prehabilitation exercise prior to surgery.  Research on rehabilitation has demonstrated the benefits of exercise to restore strength and mobility in the frail population.  Take the time to read, One Last Question Before the Operation: Just How Frail Are You? by Paula Span in the October 27, 2017 issue of the New York Times.  Read the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/health/elderly-surgery-frailty.html

In the senior population, fitness activities must focus on training that maintains functional mobility and an independent lifestyle.  You need to stand up and train to be a more graceful and competent walker.  Practice drills that improve your capacity to transfer from the floor to standing.  Always include balance and reaction exercises that keep you free from falls.  Foremost are strengthening activities that maintain bone density and restore capacity to lift, carry, push, and pull.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

* New York Times, One Last Question Before the Operation: Just How Frail Are You? Paula Span, October 27, 2017

PDFRead about keeping your hip flexors healthy and working well in Mike’s article, Nobody Names Their Child Iliacus.  Video instruction of the exercises in the article is available.  Jeff Tirrell gives five nutrition rules than can be broke.  Find out the correct way to set up your dual action air assault bike.

Download Here

PDFFind out if you scalenes are causing problems in Mike’s article, Scalene Salvation.  Read the inspirational stories of some Fenton Fitness members who conquered osteoporosis.

Download Here

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Snatch

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Snatch.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/TrOhhKLIpqA.

The Hang Snatch, like the Hang Clean, is a better, easier option to learn than the full Snatch or Power Snatch.  Again, you start from the standing position.  We teach the Hang Snatch with a Hang Clean grip.  The traditional grip of the Snatch is much wider and places much more stress on the shoulders.  It is done to reduce the distance the bar must travel so you can increase the load you are able to use.  If you are not competing in Weightlifting, however, this doesn’t matter.  Once you are ready for the Hang Snatch and have the required shoulder mobility (can you touch your fingers behind your back?), it is the best power movement out there. The lighter loads used on this exercise compared to the Hang Clean make it an even friendlier exercise on your spine and the longer bar path requires more power output.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Clean

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Clean.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do.  See the video here: https://youtu.be/KupitKep6Lk

The problem with the traditional Clean and Power Clean is that many people have trouble getting into a good position to start the movement.  The Hang Clean eliminates this problem by starting from the standing position.  It only requires a small amount of hip movement, yet still produces a great deal of power.  A good goal for your hang clean is to do the same amount of weight as your 1 rep max bench press.  If you can’t get there, you need more cleans and less bench work.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

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