(810) 750-1996 PH
Fenton Fitness (810) 750-0351 PH
Fenton Physical Therapy (810) 750-1996 PH
Linden Physical Therapy (810) 735-0010 PH
Milford Physical Therapy (248) 685-7272 PH

Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

resistance

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#10–Establish A Veggie And Protein Habit

One of the biggest deficits I see in many food logs is the lack of protein consumed.  We have been conditioned to snack on high carb/highly processed food, so eating more protein can be a difficult shift.  When I do see protein, it’s in the higher fat varieties of sausage, bacon, burgers, etc.  It would benefit younger individuals to start adding healthy doses of protein to their diets as soon as they are responsible for their own food preparation.  Shoot to have some form of lean protein as the base of your meal along with a couple of servings of vegetables. Once you have that base (taking up ½ to ⅔ of your plate), then you can add in whole grains, starchy carbs, fruits, dairy, healthy fats, etc.  Protein increases your metabolic rate more than any other nutrient, aids in recovery, helps build and maintain muscle mass, and much more.  We recommend 25-35% of total calories to come from protein, or 0.8-1gram/pound of body weight.  Most individuals should shoot for 4-8 servings of vegetables per day as well.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#9–Build Muscle

Much like strength, muscle mass is often not prioritized until it is largely too late.  Though you can still build muscle at an older age, it is much more difficult.  Muscle mass is highly correlated with strength which is correlated with power.  All of these tend to decline substantially at around age 30.  If you take advantage of your hormonal environment and your recovery abilities in your 20’s, you can stockpile a good amount of muscle for the rest of your life so that you can keep doing everything you want as you age.  More muscle also means a better and healthier metabolism which means less accumulation of unwanted body fat and overall better health. The best way to build muscle mass is through resistance training with gradual increases to volume (weight x reps x sets) over time along with a moderate to high protein intake.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Fitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated.  Physical performance and recovery capacity is dramatically different.  If you need proof, look around for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL.  The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime.  I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client. 

Manage Eccentric Muscle Loading

sledDuring the concentric portion of a lift, the muscles shorten as the load is moved.  In the eccentric phase, the muscles gradually lengthen as the load is lowered in a controlled manner.  Eccentric muscle activity (lengthening under tension) produces more muscle micro trauma and, therefore, requires more recuperation time.  It is the eccentric aspect of a resistance exercise that creates delayed onset muscle soreness.

Older fitness clients do not possess the same recovery capacity as younger individuals.  Utilizing exercise activities that reduce eccentric stress is a valuable training tactic.  Concentric biased training allows older trainees to perform a greater volume of work and be ready a day or two later for the next training session.
Sled work is my favorite “concentric only” fitness activity.  The muscles shorten to propel the sled and never have to lengthen against resistance.  You can push, pull, row, and press a sled at fairly high levels of exertion and still sufficiently recover between training sessions.

Loaded step ups are a predominantly concentric contraction, lower extremity strengthening exercise.  It teaches balance, core control, and improves single leg strength. The eccentric aspect of a loaded step up is minimal and this makes it an essential exercise for older fitness clients.

My favorite upper extremity eccentric only training device is the Surge 360.  The Surge provides resistance through a series of multi-directional pistons.  All exercise activities on the Surge are concentric only.

Resistance tubing is another tool that can help manage eccentric muscle activity.  The force curve (increased load as the tubing is lengthened and decreased as it gets shorter) helps reduce muscle activity during the eccentric aspect of many exercises.
-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

A physician friend sent me this recently released research article on the benefits of maintaining strength and muscle mass as we age.  I think everyone should take the time to read this article.  We are keeping people alive for longer periods of time, but how well are they living?  The discussion of the extension of life span compared to enhancement of health span is worthy of consideration.  Improving muscle mass and strength dramatically improves quality of life, a factor often not given enough consideration.

10522_2015_9631_Fig1_HTMLAge-related sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass as we age.  Sarcopenia and functional disability travel hand in hand.  Combating sarcopenia has become a hot research topic as greater numbers of the American population pass through old age and the cost of their care becomes an issue.  The good news is that age-related sarcopenia is a very treatable condition.  The bad news is that it takes some education and effort.   When discussing the need for strength training, these are the top questions/concerns I get from physical therapy patients and fitness clients:

OK, how much, how difficult, and how often?
After the eye rolling, this is the question I get from most of my sarcopenic patients.  The research training programs that successfully reversed age-related sarcopenia involved four to seven progressive resistance exercises performed for a total of twelve to twenty sets.  The participants trained two or three times a week and the level of perceived exertion fell into the mild to moderate regions.  You are looking at 90 – 150 minutes a week of mild to moderate exercise.  The important, and often completely missed, aspect of progressive resistance training is that you increase the resistance or load lifted as you become stronger.

Can’t I just do yoga, golf, tennis, hot yoga, swim, walk, chair yoga, tiddly-wink, Pilates, underwater yoga?
I am sorry but the research studies have not found that these training modalities produce the necessary stimulus to combat age-related sarcopenia.  You can still perform all of these activities– just include a consistent program of progressive resistance strength training.

I don’t know what to do…
Poor exercise selection and beginner’s enthusiasm are the biggest reasons people fail with progressive resistance strength training.  Exercise is like medicine, administer the correct prescription at the proper dose and the results will be good.  Just like a visit to your physician, it all starts with an evaluation.  You need to start at a level that makes you better and not broken.  Get instruction from a qualified coach and follow his/her plan.  A big warning- the world of fitness is filled with many “certified experts” -–it took them a full weekend to complete their training.  These experts keep us busy in the physical therapy clinic.

You can view the research article here: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10522-015-9631-7
-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

One of the best training tools is a set of all purpose bands ($25.00 from performbetter.com). These bands are a sturdy, dipped latex product made by Lifeline. They have two handles on one endLunge_Row and a loop system that makes them easy to anchor in either a closed door or around something stable and upright. The bands come in progressive resistance levels and can be integrated into many beneficial exercises. One of my favorite resistance band exercises is the posterior lunge and row.

I like exercise activities that produce a lot of benefit for the time invested in training. These are the big benefits of the posterior lunge and row:

Continue reading

Ten million people in the U.S. have osteoporosis. An additional 18 million are at risk to develop it. An additional 34 million are at risk to develop osteopenia, or low bone mass. These ailments lead to higher incidents of fractures which lead to lack of physical activity and a quick decline in the fitness and health of affected individuals.

Last week, we talked about the vital role our diet plays when it comes to preventing osteoporosis by providing the needed nutrients to build and maintain strong bones. It should be noted that over half of our bone mass is accumulated during adolescence (12.5 years for girls and 14 years for boys) with peak bone mass being achieved in our mid 20’s. It is, therefore, very important for people of all ages, especially younger individuals, to incorporate appropriate activities and nutrition and not wait until we are in our 50’s and beyond to start trying to modify diet and activity.

In addition to giving our bodies the needed nutrients of calcium, vitamin D, and protein, the most effective way to stimulate our bone density is through activity. Ultimately, putting our bones under large amounts of force gives them the stimulus they need to get dense and strong.como

There are two main ways we can put stress on our bones where the requisite force is being absorbed or transferred which in turn stimulates bone density. One such way is through weight bearing exercises which force your body to absorb impact. These include walking (on hard surfaces), running, sprinting, jumping, and various upper extremity plyometric exercises. The potential drawback to some of these exercises is that they can be hard on your joints (knees, hips, back, ankles), especially for those with preexisting conditions in these areas. This type of training should be used 2-3x/week for 15-30 minutes.

The second form is that of resistance training. This can be done with machines, bands, body weight, or free weights. It has been demonstrated that free weight activities using barbells, dumbbells, and kettlebells (especially at heavier weights/intensities) lead to greater force production. It would stand to reason, therefore, that utilizing primarily free weight exercises with moderate to heavy weights would be most effective at increasing/maintaining bone density. Resistance training should be performed 3-5 times per week for 30-60 minutes.

It should be noted that low/no impact activities such as swimming, water aerobics, yoga, elliptical trainers, and biking provide little stimulus for improving bone density. Also, even with the best training protocol, appropriate considerations must be made in regard to nutrition to be sure the needed nutrients are available to build up our bones.

Click on the link below to see video demonstration of one of our members in action:

-Jeff Tirrell, B.S., OCS, CSCS

osteoporosisWorldwide, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over age 50 will experience osteoporotic fractures.

A 10% loss of bone in the vertebrae can double the risk of vertebral fractures and similarly a 10% loss of bone in the hip can result in a 2.5 times greater risk of hip fracture.

In the USA, the 52 million people with either osteoporosis or low bone mass represent 55% of the people age 50 and older.

About 25% of hip fractures occur in men.  Twenty percent of the men who suffer a hip fracture die within 12 months.  Men have a much higher mortality rate after a hip fracture than women.

Hip fractures cause the greatest loss of function.  Fully 40% are unable to walk independently and 60% require assistance for activities of daily living a year after the hip fracture.  Because of these functional mobility deficits, 33% are totally dependent or in a nursing home in the year following a hip fracture.

Vertebral fractures can lead to back pain, loss of height, deformity, immobility, and reduced pulmonary function.  Statistically a vertebral fracture is the biggest predictor of another osteoporotic fracture in the next two years.

In the USA, the combined lifetime risk for a forearm, hip, or vertebral fracture is around 40%.  That is equivalent to heart disease.

The adjusted mean, first-year costs of a fracture from a comprehensive study by Jefferson University:  hip $26,545, vertebral $14,977, and non-hip, non-vertebral $9,183.  The statistics start at age fifty.  Predictably costs go higher as the age of the patient gets older.  These numbers are now five years old– nothing medical has become less expensive.

Bone Building Preventative Training

We know that individuals who participate in consistent resistance training exercises are more likely to have better bone density.  Just like muscle, bone is a living thing that grows stronger in response to the force that is placed upon it.  The best bone building exercise activities produce a growth-promoting stimulus through your skeleton.  Bone building exercises are easy to understand, but they do require more effort than swallowing a pill or having an injection.  Carry a kettlebell, push a loaded sled fifty yards, or perform a few sets of box jumps–jump up and step down.  Your bones will stay well mineralized, but you will miss meeting all those nice people in the emergency room.

-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

My buddy Denna works exclusively with clients who have the primary goal of losing body fat.  She sent me a research article from the journal Obesity*.  It was impressive in that it followed the waist circumference of over 10 thousand men for twelve years.  In the world of research, twelve years and 10 thousand subjects are impressive.

The results of the study are important in that they clearly show that one form of exercise is more effective at preventing the most unhealthy type of fat deposits.  The men who performed resistance training exercise gained far less belly fat than the men who performed cardio-based exercise.  The cardio group gained nearly twice as much abdominal area fat as the weight trainers.

The tape measure is more important than the scale.  A larger waistline is a bigger predictor for premature death than overall body weight.  Higher risk levels kick in for men with a waistline greater than 40 inches and women with a waistline greater than 35 inches.  Researchers have found that even patients who would be considered at normal weight faced far greater risk of death if they had a large waist.

Since the mid 1990’s, we have known that body fat is not just an inert form of stored energy that Mother Nature created to carry us through a famine.  Body fat is an endocrine organ that secretes hormones that turn genes on and off in cells throughout the body.  Visceral fat, the kind stored in and around belly, is the hormonal driver of metabolic syndrome, the precursor to diabetes, elevated blood lipids, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease.  What this study demonstrated is that we can fight back by training to develop the muscle mass that fights off the hormonal effects of fat deposits.

To read the findings, click on the link below:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20949/abstract

-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

*Obesity

Volume 23, Issue 2, pages 461-467, February 2015. Mekary, R. et. al.

Categories