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Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

pushing

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Wall Balls

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Wall Balls.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. You can view the video here: https://youtu.be/vCWu2gsCfU4.

If you are looking for a full body movement that offers the same triple extension (ankle, knee, hip) as the traditional weightlifting movements, then this exercise is for you.  Wall Balls focus on vertical power development.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Chest Pass

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Chest Pass.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/iN4qcOPe2vo

The Med Ball chest pass is a great exercise to build up horizontal pushing power.  It can be regressed to be stable, safe, and emphasize the upper body musculature, or progressed to be very dynamic and athletic in nature.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Pushing Through Fitness Barriers

Pushing For Big Results

Most of us have busy schedules and limited time to exercise at the gym.  We want the most benefit possible for our time spent working out.  Sled Pushing is a high value activity that can be utilized by almost all fitness clients.

True Core Stability
How our “muscles in the middle” truly work is in a standing position with our legs in contact with the ground.  The legs are usually in an asymmetrical stance, transferring force from the ground through our body into the arms.  Sled pushing more closely emulates the demands placed on our spinal stabilizers during daily activities.

Training Acceleration
In sports performance, the development of acceleration—the first four or five strides– is critical.   Weight room training with box jumps, barbell squatting, and hang cleans has been shown to produce a better vertical leap number, but not nearly the same gains in 40 yard dash times.  It trains the neural pathways that turn on your acceleration muscles.  Sled pushing places the body in the forward lean position you need to properly accelerate out of the blocks when sprinting.

The Road to Easy Recovery
Sled pushing is all concentric muscle activity and no eccentric.  Eccentric muscle activity (the muscles lengthen against a resistance), creates much of the muscle soreness brought on by exercise.  Your body needs more time to recover from eccentric muscle activity.  You can perform a greater volume of work with a sled, and not be terribly sore the next day.  For older trainees whose bodies require more recovery time, sled work is a valuable training tool.

The Injured Athletes Rehab Training
If you have a knee, lower back, or hip injury, you may not be able to perform squats, lunges, deadlifts, or kettlebell swings.  Sled pushing is an alternative rehabilitation exercise for the lower body.  I have had great success treating runners with knee pain using sled work as a recovery exercise.  The core stability demands of sled pushing are helpful in restoring lumbar function in lower back pain patients.

Scalable to Any Fitness Level
Beginners can start with an empty sled and gradually add weight.  I have been able to progress physical therapy patients from 25 pounds to 125 pounds in as little as four weeks time.  Pushing is a basic movement pattern that most master after two or three attempts.

Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

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