(810) 750-1996 PH
Fenton Fitness (810) 750-0351 PH
Fenton Physical Therapy (810) 750-1996 PH
Linden Physical Therapy (810) 735-0010 PH
Milford Physical Therapy (248) 685-7272 PH

Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

protein

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#10–Establish A Veggie And Protein Habit

One of the biggest deficits I see in many food logs is the lack of protein consumed.  We have been conditioned to snack on high carb/highly processed food, so eating more protein can be a difficult shift.  When I do see protein, it’s in the higher fat varieties of sausage, bacon, burgers, etc.  It would benefit younger individuals to start adding healthy doses of protein to their diets as soon as they are responsible for their own food preparation.  Shoot to have some form of lean protein as the base of your meal along with a couple of servings of vegetables. Once you have that base (taking up ½ to ⅔ of your plate), then you can add in whole grains, starchy carbs, fruits, dairy, healthy fats, etc.  Protein increases your metabolic rate more than any other nutrient, aids in recovery, helps build and maintain muscle mass, and much more.  We recommend 25-35% of total calories to come from protein, or 0.8-1gram/pound of body weight.  Most individuals should shoot for 4-8 servings of vegetables per day as well.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#9–Build Muscle

Much like strength, muscle mass is often not prioritized until it is largely too late.  Though you can still build muscle at an older age, it is much more difficult.  Muscle mass is highly correlated with strength which is correlated with power.  All of these tend to decline substantially at around age 30.  If you take advantage of your hormonal environment and your recovery abilities in your 20’s, you can stockpile a good amount of muscle for the rest of your life so that you can keep doing everything you want as you age.  More muscle also means a better and healthier metabolism which means less accumulation of unwanted body fat and overall better health. The best way to build muscle mass is through resistance training with gradual increases to volume (weight x reps x sets) over time along with a moderate to high protein intake.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

The holidays offer ample opportunity to eat, drink, and be merry with family and friends. Unfortunately, this may not be in the best interest of our health or our waistline. Every other week, we will feature a nutrition tip to help minimize the damage during the holiday season and avoid feeling so guilty come January 1st.

When it comes to avoiding weight/fat gain, energy balance is the name of the game. Many of our favorite holiday treats are high calorie/fat/sugar which is what makes them taste so great. One of the simplest things we can do to combat the impulse of overeating is plan ahead by adjusting our eating habits surrounding a given meal accordingly. Ideally, we won’t have more than one holiday party/gathering in a given week. The day of the party, eat a meal that consists solely of very lean protein (extra lean turkey, chicken breast, extra lean ground beef, egg whites, or Whey Protein Isolate, etc.) and lots of fibrous/low calorie vegetables Vegetables(broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, asparagus, brussel sprouts, etc.). Vegetables and lean protein have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to increase satiety (feelings of fullness) and should cause you to eat less later on at the party. Try to consume at least 0.5g/lb of body weight in protein before leaving for the big meal and shoot for 3-5 cups of vegetables. Not only will you be less hungry later, but you will have met your daily protein and vegetable requirements which many people tend to skimp on at large dinners. When making your selections, try to fill at least a portion of your plate with a leaner protein choice and vegetables (if there are any without sauces/cheese on them). Eat, drink, lift, and be merry!

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

Ten million people in the U.S. have osteoporosis. An additional 18 million are at risk to develop it. An additional 34 million are at risk to develop osteopenia, or low bone mass. These ailments lead to higher incidents of fractures which lead to lack of physical activity and a quick decline in the fitness and health of affected individuals.

When it comes to preventing osteoporosis, our diet plays a vital role in providing the needed nutrients to build and maintain strong bones. It should be noted that over half of our bone mass is accumulated during adolescence (12.5 years for girls, and 14 years for boys) with peak bone mass being achieved in our mid 20’s. It is, therefore, very important for people of all ages, especially younger individuals, to incorporate appropriate activities and nutrition and not wait until we are in our 50’s and beyond to start trying to modify diet and activity.

The three main nutrients responsible for building and maintaining bone density are Calcium, Vitamin D, and Protein.

Calcium: 99% of the calcium found in the human body resides in our bones which act as a reservoir, assisting in the maintenance of calcium levels indairy-fact-sheet-icon our blood. When calcium intake is low, our body must pull more calcium from our bones making them less dense and, therefore, weaker. The following foods are excellent sources of calcium: milk (and most other dairy products), broccoli, kale, sardines, almonds, and brazil nuts. For those who are lactose intolerant, look for lactose free milk options such as Lactaid. Calcium is best absorbed with Vitamin D so try to pair foods together for best results.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D assists the body in its absorption of calcium in the intestines as well as ensures the proper storage of calcium in the bone. Vitamin D is also helpful in improving muscle strength and balance which reduces fall risk. Vitamin D can be made by the skin when exposed to UVB rays from sunlight. Strive for 10-20 minutes of direct sun exposure/day on bare skin without sunblock. If you have fair skin, or the season dictates that this is not an option, the following foods have large amounts of vitamin D: salmon, mackerel, sardines, egg yolks, liver, milk, and some fortified cereals.

Protein: Protein provides the essential amino acids needed to build bones. Low protein diets diminish peak bone mass during adolescence, negatively affecting skeletal growth and the preservation of bone mass as we age. In elderly populations, low protein intake is highly associated with low bone density. Low protein diets also lead to reduced lean body mass and strength which increase your fall risk. Protein intake should be at minimum 0.5g/lb of bodyweight and may need to be as high as 1g/lb of lean body weight. As we age, we often need to be on the higher end of this range.

Other risk factors for osteoporosis include: decreased milk consumption, anorexia, being overweight or obese, drinking more than 2 alcoholic drinks/day, and having a BMI <19.

For more information on nutrition and bone health from the International Osteoporosis Foundation, click on the link below:

http://www.worldosteoporosisday.org/resources/2015/fact-sheet

-Jeff Tirrell, B.S., CSCS, Pn1

When I work with members on nutrition, I have found 3 main roadblocks: lack of vegetables, lack of protein, and snacking.  Snacking, or grazing, is one of the biggest eating pitfalls that people fall into.  If I were to guess, I would bet that eliminating snacks and calorically dense drinks (pop, juice, etc.) would cut the obesity rate in half in our country.

Because we are a snacking society, it is rarely a question of eliminating snacks, but rather recommending popcorn_snack_fast_food“acceptable” snack foods.  To be quite honest, I don’t like the concept of snacks because for most people, including myself, they are problematic.  If you are eating appropriately and feel hunger, you don’t need a “snack.”  You need to sit down and take time to eat a meal consisting of lean protein, vegetables, a small amount of healthy fats, and possibly whole grains or fruit.  For many, snacking becomes a mindless process of hand to mouth interaction to help pass the time.  A jar of M&M’s on her desk at work, a bag of chips to eat while he watches TV, a nibble on some samples at the grocery store…  All of this is mindless eating serves no real purpose in meeting our nutritional needs.

Depending on your schedule, activity level, and preference, you would be better served eating 2-5 meals per day and forgetting the snacks.  This is a huge undertaking, and I appreciate the psychological aspect to making this type of shift.  For those who aren’t completely ready to overhaul their eating behavior, it is best to choose snacks that are low in calories, high in protein and fiber, and full of micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals).

Following are my top 21 snack picks for the health conscious with their respective serving size, calorie count, and protein content.  Sub these in for your current snack items (the closer to the top you get the better), and eventually, ditch the snacks all together if trying to lose body fat.

Click on the link below to access the list:

Top 21 Snack Foods

-Jeff Tirrell, B.S., CSCS, Pn1

 

 

Categories