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Learn how to keep your shoulders healthy in Mike’s article, “Graceful Shoulder Aging”. Jeff Tirrell gives some practical advice on how to train, and Mike explains the importance of changing your fitness routine.

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Standing Desk Exercise Rx

Work Station Transition Training

As a physical therapist making his living taking care of people with pain problems and physical limitations caused by prolonged sitting, I am an avid promoter of standing desks.  Over the last five years, the prices of standing desk products have come down and the variety has increased.  Manufacturers now permit a 30 day “no risk” trial.  Try a standing desk for thirty days and then ship it back if it does not meet your needs.  I encourage anyone who must sit for more than five hours a day to convert some of those sitting hours to a stand up desk.  Employers are now aware of the benefit of standing desks and actively encouraging their use.  It can take some time to become accustomed to working at a standing desk.  I have three training tools that can help make working at a standing desk easier.  Read this article and watch the video for a demonstration of how to use each product.

Foot Care With a Spiky Ball

The bottom of the foot is a busy intersection of muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and nerves.  Heel and plantar pain are common reasons we see patients in the physical therapy clinic.  Foot pain problems can take months to fully recover.  A little proactive soft tissue treatment will bulletproof the feet from overuse injury and pain.   A spiky ball is a small sphere with fairly aggressive projections.  Take off your shoes and give your peds a little love by rolling the bottom of your foot over a spiky ball.  Spiky balls come in various sizes and resistances.  I have found the smaller (2 ½ – 3 inch) and firmer models work the best for my foot.  Most people report that it “hurts good” and often get one for work and one for the home office.  Most spiky balls cost around seven dollars.

Posture Correction With Resistance Bands

If you have been a long-term seated data input warrior, you have probably been infected with the i-hunch virus.  As we get older, the muscles that hold the thoracic region tall and pull the shoulder blades back tend to get weaker at a faster rate than other muscles.  Prolonged standing is going to be challenging without some remedial rebooting of the software that holds you tight and tall.  I keep a ¼ inch superband (nine dollars from performbetter.com) at my desk and perform two upper body postural strengthening exercises.  Posture restoration takes some time so work on these drills every day for at least three months.

Band Pull Aparts

Choose a resistance band that allows you to perform a complete set without reaching failure.  The force produced by the band becomes greater as you travel through the movement so avoid a band with a strong resistance.   The tempo of the movement should stay smooth and steady.

Stand tall with the chest proud and the head pulled back.  Do not arch the upper back.  Tighten the abdominal muscle and keep the front of the rib cage down.  Hold the elbows fully extended and the wrist in neutral.  You can use either a palms up or a palms down arm position.  Individuals with some shoulder wear and tear may feel better with a palms up position.  Hold the arms up to 85 degree shoulder flexion and start with a low level of tension on the band.  Concentrate your efforts on the muscles between your shoulder blades as you pull the band apart and bring the hands out to the side.  Let the band stretch across the chest and pull the hands behind the body.  Tempo: Two counts- pull the band apart. Two counts- hold at end range. Two counts- return to the starting position.   Repetitions:  10 – 20 repetitions.

Postural Band Aid

One of the most convenient and easy to perform postural correction activities is an exercise I call the postural band aid.  Take a short length of therapy resistance band and stand up.  Assume a tall posture with a proud chest and the head pulled back.  Hold one side of the band in each hand with the palms up.  Keep the elbows by the side and bent to 90 degrees.  Pull the band apart so that your arms form a letter W with your arms and body.  You should feel a tightening of the muscle between your shoulder blades.  Hold the band apart for three counts and then slowly release back to the starting position.  Perform ten repetitions.

Dynamic Core Stability With Dynamax Medicine Ball

Physical therapy patients and fitness clients often complain of lower back fatigue when using a standing desk.  Solve this problem with some dynamic stabilization training.  Place a Dynamax medicine ball or an under inflated basketball under the desk and take turns elevating one leg up onto the ball.  The round ball creates a degree of instability that kicks in the stabilizers of the pelvic girdle and lower back.  Changing position and relieving stress on the joints in the pelvic girdle and lumbar spine can help abolish symptoms of fatigue.  It is one of the reasons your local saloon has a place to rest your foot when you belly up to the bar.  The majority of standing desk users report an improvement in symptoms using this simple alteration in stance.

Watch the video here

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

 

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#8 Embrace the Suck

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Embrace the Suck

As humans we tend to gravitate toward things that we are good at and that don’t make us uncomfortable.  In training it’s fine to play to your strengths.  Do the things you like, enjoy, and are good at.  After all, one of the most important things for long term success is consistency.  If you don’t like what you are doing, then long term you won’t stick with it.  However, the things that we aren’t good at often expose critical weaknesses or shortcomings.  Find the things you aren’t good with and do at least one of them each time you train.  This could be mobility, balance, heavy strength work, a certain exercise, etc.  For every three things you do that you like and are good at, try to have one thing included that is mentally and/or physically challenging that doesn’t feel natural (but is still pain free) and you don’t particularly enjoy.  This will help ensure that there are no “kinks” in your fitness armor.

Wrapping It All Up

Move daily doing something.  Accumulate 4+ hours of training each week.  Hit every movement pattern while minimizing machines and single joint movements.  Training should be ordered as follows: Soft tissue/self-massage, stretch/mobilize, activation/core/balance, speed/power/agility, strength, and then conditioning/cardio. Do things you aren’t good at, and don’t ignore pain.  Do all of this for months, years, and decades on end and reap the rewards of a solid fitness program on quality of life, aesthetics, and resiliency.

 

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#7 Don’t Train Through Pain

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Don’t Train Through Pain

We’ve all heard the tough guy mantras of “No Pain, No Gain” or the Marine Corps mantra of “Pain is weakness leaving the body”.  The reality is that pain is a big red flag that something is wrong.  While there are a lot of reasons pain can be present (including mental health issues), training through pain typically only makes things worse, can lead to more serious injury, and may lead to a long-term time off from training.  When pain is present, we want to train around it, not through it.  This can be done by limiting range of motion, elimination or emphasizing certain muscle actions (Eccentric, Concentric, Isometric), or simply finding a different exercise that targets the same muscle groups.  Some individuals just seem to have problems with certain exercises.  As long as there are other exercises that they can train the same muscles with similar types of movements, then this is not a big deal.  If pain is chronically present and begins to impact day to day activities, then it’s best to see a skilled Physical Therapist to help troubleshoot and find a good solution.  Effort/challenge are good and often needed for progress.  Pain on the other hand, especially long term will lead to problems.

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#6 Be Functional

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Be Functional

Functional fitness started out with the best of intentions.  Good strength coaches and Physical Therapists saw a disconnect between the machine based and single joint isolation work that many bodybuilders had popularized in the 80s and 90s, and wanted to promote training that made the body more resilient and better able to perform daily tasks.  When we are talking about being functional, we simply want our training to help us with day to day tasks and reduce injury risk.  This is typically best done by training on our feet, on the floor, single arm/single leg, and using multi joint movements.  An easy recommendation is that no more than ⅓ of your training should involve sitting, machines, or single joint movements unless you have major orthopedic limitations.  Pushing, Pulling, Carrying/Crawling, Squatting, Lunging/Step Ups, and Hip Hinges should all be a regular part of your weekly training plan with each pattern being performed 2 times per week or more ideally.

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#5 Get Fast and Explosive

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Get Fast & Explosive

One area that is often neglected in many general fitness plans is power, speed, and agility work.  This is unfortunate as this is one of the quickest areas to decrease as we age.  This type of training should be done after a thorough warm up (soft tissue work, stretching, and activation work).  This work can include Medicine Ball Throws, KB Swings, Olympic Weightlifting variations (cleans, snatches, and their variations), jumps, sprints, bounds, hops, and various change in direction drills.  What’s important is that these things are not done in a state of fatigue.  If our explosiveness, power, or speed begin to decrease substantially, then we cease to get the benefits we are striving for.  We want to pick things that we are competent in, have progressed to slowly, and that don’t cause an undue risk of injury.  We start most of our clients with Med Ball throws starting in kneeling position, bounds/skips, and box jumps.  For many people, this is all they will need, for others we will progress to move complex or taxing modalities based off their ability, goals, and tolerance.  It’s best to perform this type of training 2-3 times per week before your strength or conditioning work for 3-10 sets or 2-6 repetitions with plenty of rest between sets.

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#4 Condition/Cardio

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Condition/Cardio

All of the strength, mobility, and stability in the world are somewhat useless if basic tasks fatigue or wind you.  Cardiovascular training or conditioning work (depending on what you want to call it) can be done in a number of different ways, but it’s important that it gets done.  Benefits can be seen with as little as 2 sessions per week lasting less than 20 minutes.  You can perform High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) or low to moderate intensity steady state training (think walking, jogging, riding a bike, etc.) depending on time, preference, and orthopedic limitations.  These can be built into your strength training workouts or done on separate days.  The main thing to keep in mind when training your cardiovascular system or working on conditioning is to pick low risk exercise options.  Jumps, repeated sprints, Olympic weight lifting, burpees, and the like are not great options to use as conditioning tools.  When fatigue increases, form/technique decreases, and risk of injury drastically rises.  It is best to pick modes of exercise that require little thought for form or technique when picking conditioning tools.  At Fenton Fitness, we personally like Walking, Sled Push/Pulls, Upright Bikes, Rowers, Ski Ergometers, Jacobs Ladder (or Step mills), and Slide Boards.

 

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#3 Work on Mobility/Stability

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Work on Mobility/Stability

Make sure you can move each joint through its maximal pain free range of motion.  On top of being able to move through that range, we also want to be able to control or “own” that range of motion.  This can be done by using full range of motion in your strength exercises, as well as incorporating some full body warm ups that address each.  At Fenton Fitness, we try to hit 2-3 hip stretches, 1-2 thoracic spine/shoulder stretches, and 2-3 activation/stability drills at the beginning of each workout.  If an individual has no restrictions, a good bang for the buck warm up can be seen in this video. This type of work can be done daily, but I would suggest a minimum of 3 days per week to maintain your movement quality.

 View the video here

Learn how some simple exercises can reduce or prevent lower back pain in Mike O’Hara’s article “Daily Lower Back Pain Meditation”.  Jeff Tirrell explains the importance of working with a qualified trainer in a small group.   Do you know the five fitness numbers everyone should know?

Download Here

Eight Habits for Long Term Fitness Success–#2 Get Stronger

There are thousands of different workout programs and methods to use to become more fit.  These range from at home workout videos, to aerobic or yoga classes, to bootcamps and group functional training workouts.  Methods, benefits, and risks/drawbacks could be debated until our last breath and often are among fitness professionals.  One thing I’ve come to learn in my twenty years in this industry is that dogmatic approaches rarely pan out, and you are better off steering clear of anything or anyone who claims any one method of training is optimal and a cure all for everyone under every circumstance.  However, I do believe that there are some universal habits that will vastly improve someone’s fitness.  For the sake of this article, I will stick with habits which only involve movement, with an understanding that nutrition, rest, recovery, stress management, and body weight all impact fitness as well.

To know what habits will best improve long term fitness, we must first define the term.  There are three definitions of fitness. The first (and newest, brought on by the growth of the fitness industry) is “the condition of being physically fit and healthy.” This definition misses the mark as it uses the root of the word in it, and doesn’t really tell us anything.  The second definition is “the quality of being suitable to fulfill a particular role or task.”  This definition is a little bit better.  We can see here that the fitness required to be an NFL offensive lineman and the fitness required to run the Ironman in Hawaii is much different.  This still doesn’t get to what most of us think of when we describe someone as being fit.  The third definition, and the one I find to be most relevant to the general population, is “an organism’s ability to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.”  Put differently, your ability to reproduce and pass your genes onto the next generation.  At first glance, this may seem like a poor definition.  If we go back 100-500 years to a time where modern technology and medicine couldn’t “fix” everything, this definition is ideal.  If someone is over or underweight, they struggle with fertility.  If someone has major health complications, injuries, etc. they would have a hard time attracting a mate, defending themselves/home, or feeding themselves.  Certain lifestyle choices will absolutely reduce fertility rates (smoking, drinking, stress) therefore decreasing one’s fitness.  Operating with the biological definition of fitness, I find that the following eight habits will set you up for a lifetime of greatness.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Get Strong(er)

Strength is probably one of the greatest indicators of longevity and quality of life that we have.  How strong is strong enough will get you different responses depending on what strength coach you talk to and what population we are talking about.  However, one thing is for certain.  You can almost always get stronger at something, and there is virtually no drawback to being stronger.  Most people will be best served by having 5-6 movements that they focus on getting really strong at, and keeping those in their training plan for 6-12 weeks at a time.  I typically recommend picking one movement from each movement category (Squat, Lunge, Hinge, Push, Pull, and Carry/Crawl) and getting as strong as possible on that given movement.  Pick movements that you feel comfortable with, are pain free, and of which you have maximal range of motion.  Stick with 2-6 repetitions, 3-5 sets, 2 times per week for best results.

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