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nutrition

Learn how to keep your shoulders healthy in Mike’s article, “Graceful Shoulder Aging”. Jeff Tirrell gives some practical advice on how to train, and Mike explains the importance of changing your fitness routine.

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Learn how some simple exercises can reduce or prevent lower back pain in Mike O’Hara’s article “Daily Lower Back Pain Meditation”.  Jeff Tirrell explains the importance of working with a qualified trainer in a small group.   Do you know the five fitness numbers everyone should know?

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Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 4

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Healthy Fats and Portions: (week 10-12)

Healthy fats help with hormone synthesis, recovery, key metabolic tasks, regulate appetite and satiety, and make food taste good.  Healthy fats are best found in whole, minimally processed foods.  We need a balance of healthy fats to feel and function at our best.  This is an “easy” habit to understand, but a little harder to do properly since it’s easy to overeat fats.  It’s important to understand that there are different types of fat with different effects in the body.  Add healthy fats to your shopping list choosing which healthy fats/fat-containing foods you like and will eat.  Buy, prepare, and have healthy fats/fat-containing foods on hand, easily available.  When setting up your menu make sure you incorporate healthy fats at each meal.  Understand what an approximate serving size is.  Women: 1 thumb of fat per meal, Men: 1-2 thumbs of fat per meal.  Portion sizes may need to be adjusted based on activity level, goals, and meal frequency.  Understand that healthy fats, while nutritious, are still energy-dense and should be used sparingly.  It is easy to overeat this energy dense macronutrient.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind long term change requires skills and habits.  These skills must be practiced daily.  Most people will need to spend a minimum of 2 weeks on each habit before becoming competent enough to build and add on the next habit.  The Precision Nutrition system that we use  at Fenton Fitness allows us to guide you each day of the journey with your habit and a daily lesson to help you practice, understand, and troubleshoot difficulties.  Though initial progress may be slower, long term progress and sustainability put this habit based approach far ahead of any other system or diet plan in existence.  If you’re  interested in more information about our program and to see if we have any current openings, please feel free to contact us: jeff@fentonfitness.com

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1 

Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 3

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Eat at least 5 colorful servings of Fruits & Veggies: (week 6-8)

Eating more colorful fruits and vegetables improves nutritional quality and helps you feel more satisfied with your food because of the fiber and nutrient content.  Like the previous habit, we are adding food instead of taking it away, reducing any sense of deprivation.  This is another relatively “easy” habit. Most people are pretty much sold on this one even if they struggle with it. Very few will ever argue about the value of vegetables.  Strive to “eat the rainbow”, getting as many colors as possible.  Create a shopping list before going to the store with all the fruits and veggies that you enjoy.  For now, it doesn’t really matter what specific foods you choose as long as you get into the habit of “eating the rainbow”.  Prep food that requires prepping ahead of time so that convenience is never the limiting factor when it comes to getting your fruits/veggies.  Look over your weekly menu and ensure you are incorporating fruits and veggies into each meal. Understand what an approximate serving size is–Vegetables: 1 fist, Fruits: 1 cupped handful.  As you get better at this habit, try to venture outside of your comfort zone and try some new fruits and veggies, experimenting with different ways of preparing them.

Smart Carb choices and portions: (week 8-10)

Carbohydrates have gotten a bad rap over the last decade largely in part of some popular and trendy diets such as Paleo, Keto/Atkins, and Carnivore diets.  Carbohydrate dense foods have lots of great health and performance benefits.  What’s important to understand is what carbohydrate sources are best for you, have the highest nutritional value, and how much you need for your goals.  Almost all clients benefit from having some carbohydrates in their diet.

“Smart carbs” are slower-digesting, higher-fiber, and nutrient-rich. These include such foods as: whole grains (e.g. brown or wild rice, quinoa, buckwheat, etc.), beans and legumes, fruits and starchy vegetables (e.g. potatoes, sweet potatoes, bananas and plantains, etc.).  This is a “difficult” habit for some people that comes after two “easier” habits.  “Low-carb” is not ideal; most people look, feel, and perform better with some carbs in their diet, even if they’re trying to lose weight /fat.  Not all carbs are created equal: slow-digesting, high-fiber, nutrient-rich “smart carbs” are a great nutritional choice and not the same thing as highly processed sugars.  Just like the previous two habits, create a spot on your shopping list for healthy carbs that you enjoy and make sure they are in your house.  Come up with at least 4-5 different carb sources that you enjoy and are willing to eat.  At first, it doesn’t really matter what specific foods you choose as long as you get into the habit of choosing smart carbs.  Buy, prepare, and have smart carbs on hand, easily available.  When planning your weekly or daily menu, find a way to incorporate your carbohydrate sources.  Understand what an approximate serving size is: Women: 1 cupped handful per meal, Men: 1-2 cupped handfuls.  Portions may need to be adjusted based on goals, activity level, and food tolerance.

Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 2

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Stop when 80% Full: (week 2-4)

This is the second “anchor habit”. To lose fat, clients usually have to eat less than they do now.  “80% full” is not a specific number, but rather an idea: Eat until you are “just satisfied” or “no longer hungry” but not full or stuffed.  This habit continues to teach appetite awareness, building intuitive understanding and control of hunger/fullness. Over time, you will learn to sense your hunger and satiety cues properly, as well as distinguish physical hunger from cravings.  This habit helps you analyze eating habits as a process (rather than something that “just happens”). You can identify situations/cues that contribute to your eating habits and improve mindfulness.  This habit puts the burden of action on you–you have to struggle to figure this out.  This is a “hard” habit: harder to do, but simpler to understand so give yourself time to figure this out. This can be mentally, emotionally, or physically uncomfortable.  At first, you may not be able to feel hunger or fullness or any stomach cues. Try to keep learning, and pay attention to any signs that you are physically hungry or full, such as hunger cues, fullness cues, and satiety cues.  Hunger cues include “hunger headache”; light-headedness or “spaced out”; being “hangry” (hungry + angry); growling or empty-feeling stomach; etc. Over-fullness cues (ate too much) include feeling stuffed/bloated; heartburn; feeling nauseated or gassy; feeling heavy and sluggish; etc.  Satiety cues (ate just enough) include feeling energized and no longer hungry; feeling generally satisfied; feeling as though you could get up from the table and do something (such as go for a walk); etc.

You may need to learn what “100% full” or even “120% full” is first, before you can get to “80%”.  Once you learn your cues, you can learn to stop short of “stuffed” or plan to eat before you get too hungry to make good decisions. Rest assured that although you should start working on this anchor habit now, there is no time frame that you must have it mastered by. Those with chronic stomach upset may find that this habit plus the previous one actually help your condition, possibly to the point where you cut down or get off stomach medications.

Eat Lean Protein at Each Meal: (Week 4-6)

We need protein for almost every metabolic process in the body. Making sure to get enough protein will help preserve lean mass (i.e. bone and muscle), as well as help you feel fuller longer.  This is an “easy” habit that is easy to understand and generally well accepted as do-able by most individuals.  This habit clicks with most people, as it finally feels like you are getting a nutritional strategy by being told what to eat. This habit adds food instead of taking it away, which helps people feel less “deprived”.

One of the biggest aspects of this habit is learning and understanding what foods are actually high in protein (it’s not almond milk, nuts, or bacon).  Having a shopping list before going to the store with protein rich foods you enjoy is a must when doing your grocery trip.  At first, it doesn’t really matter what specific foods you choose as long as you get into the habit of adding protein to meals.  This habit is most challenging for vegetarian and especially vegans.  In these cases, more thought and planning will be needed to set up meals.  Buying, preparing, and having high protein foods easily available will greatly improve your success with this habit.  Try to create a menu for your week so you know and understand how you will incorporate protein dense foods at each meal.  Understand what a serving of protein looks like (1-1.5 palms for women, 1-2 palms for men).  Servings size may need to be adjusted based on meal frequency, goals, and food tolerance.

Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 1

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Take Time:
I hear it over and over from our clients: “I’m busy, I don’t have time to eat right.” I get it. You’re busy, we’re busy too. When you’re busy, you need to have a plan to get the important stuff done because getting into shape won’t happen by accident. Remember, nobody is going to “give” you time. You have to take that time. Create time, carve it out, grab it, defend it like a mad man once you’ve got it. Because that time is an appointment with YOU.

Here’s what a many people find about setting that time aside. Making time puts YOU in control.
Whatever your reasons for being busy (and rushed), I’m sure they’re good ones (except maybe that netflix or social media binge time). And whatever your reason, today is the day you start a new relationship with “busy”. Today, by making time, you start to take control back. Control of your life, and your time. The kind of control that will eventually make you feel more focused, more confident, more in charge, and ultimately… happier.

You need time to change your body. One more reason to make time: getting healthier, fitter, and in better shape is a slow process. You’ve got to put in the work, be patient, and persistent. But remember: If you want to change your body, being consistent is more important than anything else. So get in the habit of making that time, consistently, starting today.

Slow Down: (week 1-2)
It’s so simple, you won’t believe it, but it works. At every meal today, eat more slowly than you normally do. Today, and for the next two weeks, focus on doing this habit. Keep doing your first habit (making time). In the PN Coaching system, habits are cumulative–they build on each other, one by one. So a new habit doesn’t mean ditch the old one. A new habit means you simply add one more tool to your tool belt. In other words, keep doing your first habit: making time.

How to eat slowly: At each meal today, take a few extra minutes to simply pause (Here’s where your “make time” habit comes in handy.). Put your utensils down between each bite. Take a breath. When you take a bite, notice, and enjoy the taste and texture of the food.
Then put down those utensils again, and take another breath, or a sip of water. Relax, wait a few more moments before picking up your utensils again and repeat. That’s it. Quick tip: Try a timer.

If you’d like to track your progress with this habit, try simply timing yourself today.
Check your watch before you start eating. Or start a timer. When you’re done eating, see how long you took. Now you have a baseline for improvement! If you add only one minute per day, by the end of two weeks you’ll have added nearly 15 minutes more. Smooth ‘n’ easy.

Help yourself succeed. Eating slowly is one of the most important habits of the PN system. But in a rushing-around and busy society, it’s hard to remember at first. Changing a habit will take a little extra effort in the beginning, and that’s OK. That’s why we recommend at least two weeks on this habit. Here’s how to stay on track:
1. Make a note of your goal to eat slowly on a Post-it note, your computer, or your phone.
2. Put it somewhere that you’ll see it often, especially before you eat.
3. If you’ve used your computer or phone, set a reminder to go off before your regular meal times.
4. During your meal, try using a timer to check how fast you’re eating.
5. You can also use an app. Here is one we like: EatSlowly (for iphone)
6. Having a bit more information about what you’re actually doing can help you track your improvement with this habit over the next couple of weeks.
7. Even if you add only one minute per meal, that counts as progress!

Mike O’Hara gives tips for aging gracefully and staying fit in his article, The Five Don’ts of Sustainable Fitness. Learn the importance of increasing mobility and stability in order to get stronger, and discover how a simple test that measures how well you get up from the floor can tell a lot about whether or not your fitness program is working.

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To combat the effects of aging, consistent exercise is key.  Mike O’Hara discusses the benefits of fitness and gives tips on starting and continuing a program of exercise for life in his article, The Three Do’s of Sustainable Fitness.  Jeff Tirrell of Fenton Fitness gives nutrition tips for athletes and Mike’s exercise for better posture and more efficient movement is the bird dog.

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Calculating Nutritional Needs

If you are hoping to see serious changes in your weight and body composition, then nutrition is going to play a huge role.  There are many parts to a solid nutrition plan.  For the purposes of weight gain/loss, we must look at overall energy intake.  A chronic surplus of calories consumed leads to weight gain, while a chronic deficit leads to weight loss.  But most people want to do more than to lose or gain weight.  Most individuals want to gain or maintain lean body mass (muscle, bone, organs, tendons/ligaments, water) while decreasing body fat.  For this, we need to focus on protein.  Nutrition needs to be based on performance goals, the types of activities you enjoy doing, your lifestyle, and your food preferences.  Adherence to a program is huge, so it’s important to pick a nutritional approach that fits within your lifestyle.

Calories: We must first start with calculating caloric needs.  First, determine a good target body weight (TBW).  This should be based on a healthy/realistic body composition range.  For men, this is typically 10-20% body fat, for women it tends to be 18-30%.  A good trainer can help you determine this number/range.  Once you have your TBW, we must determine your activity multiplier.  It is important to be brutally honest here, odds are you are 1 lower than you think.  The multipliers are:

Very Inactive & Older: Multiplier is 8.  This is for anybody who never does anything physical day to day.  They have a long commute, office job, and engage in little unplanned movement from day to day.  They are also over the age of 55.

Very Inactive: Multiplier is 9.  Same as above but for individuals under the age of 55.

Inactive: Multiplier is 10.  This for anyone who while mostly sedentary during the day, does get up and walk around or move several times per day.  This can also apply to someone who doesn’t move much during the day, but has a standing desk.

Moderately Active: Multiplier is 11.  This individual is never sitting for more than 90 minutes straight and moves around several times per day.  They also engage in leisurely activities a few times each week such as walking or casual bike riding.

Active: Multiplier is 12.  This individual sits no more than 60 minutes at a time during the day, and engages in leisurely activity 5-7 days per week.

Very Active: Multiplier is 13.  This is for individuals who have a very physically demanding job such as construction, landscaping, assembly line work, etc.

Hard Gainer: Multiplier is 14.  This is reserved only for those individuals who are trying to gain wait, have a very low body fat percentage (below the norms listed), and has never been able to gain wait.

The final thing we must determine is how many moderate to intense training hours we are going to perform each week.   Again, be realistic.  Don’t count warm up time, and if you think you are going to train 3-4 hours per week, use the low number for weight loss and the high number for weight gain.  Here is what the equation looks like:

(TBW x (activity multiplier + training hours))=estimated caloric needs

Here are two examples to help you work through this:

200lb male, with a target body weight of 185lbs who is inactive, and trains 3 hours/week.

(185 x (10+3))=2405 calories/day

150lb female, with a target body weight of 140lbs who is very active and trains 2 hours/week.  (140 x (13+2))= 2100 calories/day.

Protein:  Now that calories have been determined, we must determine protein intake.  Calories will dictate weight gain/loss.  Protein will help preserve or increase lean body mass.  Protein intake should be set at 0.72 up to 1g per pound of target body weight (TBW).  So, for our 2 examples listed earlier, we would have the following:

200lb male with a TBW of 185lbs.  0.72 x 185= 133.2g

The low end would be 133 grams of protein, and we could go up to 185 grams reasonably.

150lb female with TBW of 140lbs. 0.72 x 140= 100.8g

This puts our low end at 101 grams of protein with the upper reasonable range of 140g.

There are 4 calories in 1 gram of protein.  This will come into play when we set our carbohydrate intake later.   Our male would be targeting 133-185g of protein per day which equates to 532-740 calories coming from protein.  For our female, we have targets of 101-140g of protein each day with 404-560 calories coming from protein:

Fat: Fat is essential for optimal hormonal health and should be consumed from a variety of sources.  There is no good or bad fat (outside of trans fats), we should simply seek a variety of fat sources.  Fats (just like carbohydrates) have a huge healthy range you can pick from based on food preference and tolerance.  Fat should make up 20% of your calories at a minimum, but can go as high as 1g per pound of target body weight (TBW).  Using our previous examples:

200lb male, with a TBW of 185lbs.  Calories projected at 2405/day.   0.2 x 2405=481 calories coming from fat.  There are 9 calories in each gram of fat.  So, we take 481/9=53 grams of fat each day for the lowest possible number.  The upper end would be 185g or 1665 calories from fat.  Our fat range could be 53g (481 calories) up to 185g (1665 calories).

150lb female, with TBW of 140lbs.  Calories projected at 2100/day.   0.2 x 2100=420 calories from fat.  420/9=47 g of fat.  Her low end would be 47g (420 calories from fat) up to 140g (1260 calories from fat).

Carbohydrates:  While carbohydrates are not technically essential in our diet, your brain prefers them for fuel, and intense exercise tends to be best fueled through their inclusion.  However, for the recreational gym goer who trains 2-4 days per week, the amount of carbohydrate intake probably has minimal bearing on progress.  Food preference, as well as how your body tolerates different levels should be your main determinant in setting levels here.  To determine carbohydrate levels, we simply take your remaining calories (after setting protein and fat intakes) and a lot them to carbohydrate intake.  There are 4 calories in 1 gram of carbohydrate.  So again, using our previous examples, we would have the following:

200lb male with TBW of 185lbs.  2405 calories per day, sets protein at 0.72/lb of TBW.  This equals 133g of Protein (532 calories).  This guy loves fat so he sets his fat at 1g per pound of TBW.  This would be 185g of fat (1665 calories).  So 2405-(532+1665)=208 remaining calories.  208/4=52 grams of carbohydrate.  Same guy may also choose to up protein to 1g/lb of TBW.  This would give us 185g protein (740 calories).  Let’s say he loves pasta, bread, etc.  So, he sets his fat to the minimum of 53 grams (481 calories).  In this example we have 2405-(740+481)=1184 calories from carbohydrates.  1184/4=296 grams of carbohydrate per day.  There is an endless combination of macronutrients here.

Conclusion: There are many approaches that can be used when determining nutritional needs.  The most important variable is adherence.  Can you stick to this approach long term?  Data suggests that both very low carbohydrate diets (under 100g) and very low fat diets (under 15% of total calories) are difficult to maintain beyond 6 months.  Do the foods you eat make you feel energized, taste good, and satisfy you?  These are all things that should be considered.  We want to emphasize whole foods, while not avoiding any food group entirely unless you have a proven medical condition.  These equations are to be used to help you set baseline numbers.  For weight loss, we should target 0.5% up to 1.5% body weight lost each week.  For weight gain, we should target 0.25% up to 1% body weight gain each month.  If your rates fall below or above those respective rates, we simply need to increase/decrease caloric intake accordingly.  For help setting your numbers schedule your nutrition consultation by reaching out at jeff@fentonfitness.com or calling 810-750-0351.  Nutrition coaching is available for those that require more education and/or accountability.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

In the April 2018 issue, Mike O’Hara discusses the benefits of the farmer’s walk exercise. Jeff Tirrell tells you how to reduce injury to your ligaments and tendons, and tips are given for getting back out into the garden.

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