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Standing Desk Exercise Rx

Work Station Transition Training

As a physical therapist making his living taking care of people with pain problems and physical limitations caused by prolonged sitting, I am an avid promoter of standing desks.  Over the last five years, the prices of standing desk products have come down and the variety has increased.  Manufacturers now permit a 30 day “no risk” trial.  Try a standing desk for thirty days and then ship it back if it does not meet your needs.  I encourage anyone who must sit for more than five hours a day to convert some of those sitting hours to a stand up desk.  Employers are now aware of the benefit of standing desks and actively encouraging their use.  It can take some time to become accustomed to working at a standing desk.  I have three training tools that can help make working at a standing desk easier.  Read this article and watch the video for a demonstration of how to use each product.

Foot Care With a Spiky Ball

The bottom of the foot is a busy intersection of muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and nerves.  Heel and plantar pain are common reasons we see patients in the physical therapy clinic.  Foot pain problems can take months to fully recover.  A little proactive soft tissue treatment will bulletproof the feet from overuse injury and pain.   A spiky ball is a small sphere with fairly aggressive projections.  Take off your shoes and give your peds a little love by rolling the bottom of your foot over a spiky ball.  Spiky balls come in various sizes and resistances.  I have found the smaller (2 ½ – 3 inch) and firmer models work the best for my foot.  Most people report that it “hurts good” and often get one for work and one for the home office.  Most spiky balls cost around seven dollars.

Posture Correction With Resistance Bands

If you have been a long-term seated data input warrior, you have probably been infected with the i-hunch virus.  As we get older, the muscles that hold the thoracic region tall and pull the shoulder blades back tend to get weaker at a faster rate than other muscles.  Prolonged standing is going to be challenging without some remedial rebooting of the software that holds you tight and tall.  I keep a ¼ inch superband (nine dollars from performbetter.com) at my desk and perform two upper body postural strengthening exercises.  Posture restoration takes some time so work on these drills every day for at least three months.

Band Pull Aparts

Choose a resistance band that allows you to perform a complete set without reaching failure.  The force produced by the band becomes greater as you travel through the movement so avoid a band with a strong resistance.   The tempo of the movement should stay smooth and steady.

Stand tall with the chest proud and the head pulled back.  Do not arch the upper back.  Tighten the abdominal muscle and keep the front of the rib cage down.  Hold the elbows fully extended and the wrist in neutral.  You can use either a palms up or a palms down arm position.  Individuals with some shoulder wear and tear may feel better with a palms up position.  Hold the arms up to 85 degree shoulder flexion and start with a low level of tension on the band.  Concentrate your efforts on the muscles between your shoulder blades as you pull the band apart and bring the hands out to the side.  Let the band stretch across the chest and pull the hands behind the body.  Tempo: Two counts- pull the band apart. Two counts- hold at end range. Two counts- return to the starting position.   Repetitions:  10 – 20 repetitions.

Postural Band Aid

One of the most convenient and easy to perform postural correction activities is an exercise I call the postural band aid.  Take a short length of therapy resistance band and stand up.  Assume a tall posture with a proud chest and the head pulled back.  Hold one side of the band in each hand with the palms up.  Keep the elbows by the side and bent to 90 degrees.  Pull the band apart so that your arms form a letter W with your arms and body.  You should feel a tightening of the muscle between your shoulder blades.  Hold the band apart for three counts and then slowly release back to the starting position.  Perform ten repetitions.

Dynamic Core Stability With Dynamax Medicine Ball

Physical therapy patients and fitness clients often complain of lower back fatigue when using a standing desk.  Solve this problem with some dynamic stabilization training.  Place a Dynamax medicine ball or an under inflated basketball under the desk and take turns elevating one leg up onto the ball.  The round ball creates a degree of instability that kicks in the stabilizers of the pelvic girdle and lower back.  Changing position and relieving stress on the joints in the pelvic girdle and lumbar spine can help abolish symptoms of fatigue.  It is one of the reasons your local saloon has a place to rest your foot when you belly up to the bar.  The majority of standing desk users report an improvement in symptoms using this simple alteration in stance.

Watch the video here

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Snatch

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Snatch.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/TrOhhKLIpqA.

The Hang Snatch, like the Hang Clean, is a better, easier option to learn than the full Snatch or Power Snatch.  Again, you start from the standing position.  We teach the Hang Snatch with a Hang Clean grip.  The traditional grip of the Snatch is much wider and places much more stress on the shoulders.  It is done to reduce the distance the bar must travel so you can increase the load you are able to use.  If you are not competing in Weightlifting, however, this doesn’t matter.  Once you are ready for the Hang Snatch and have the required shoulder mobility (can you touch your fingers behind your back?), it is the best power movement out there. The lighter loads used on this exercise compared to the Hang Clean make it an even friendlier exercise on your spine and the longer bar path requires more power output.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Clean

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Clean.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do.  See the video here: https://youtu.be/KupitKep6Lk

The problem with the traditional Clean and Power Clean is that many people have trouble getting into a good position to start the movement.  The Hang Clean eliminates this problem by starting from the standing position.  It only requires a small amount of hip movement, yet still produces a great deal of power.  A good goal for your hang clean is to do the same amount of weight as your 1 rep max bench press.  If you can’t get there, you need more cleans and less bench work.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Push Press

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Push Press.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do.  See the video here: https://youtu.be/1pI4eb6lMYQ

The Push Press is a limited, less technical, portion of the Clean and Jerk weightlifting movement.  It’s a great alternative as it has been shown to increase power but is much simpler to teach.  As long as you possess adequate shoulder mobility, there is much less risk with this exercise.  If done properly, both the hips and shoulders produce a large amount of vertical force which has strong carryover to sports that require jumping and overhead activities (throwers, volleyball, etc.).

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Plyo Push Ups

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Plyo Push Ups.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/C0A0dibCmqE

Plyo Push Ups are a great horizontal power exercise for the upper body that simultaneously improves core stability. Pushing has obvious carryover for most sports and tends to be more on the speed side of the power spectrum. It can be easily progressed by adding a weight vest (use caution while performing this exercise due to force on the wrists).

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Split Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Split Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. See video here: https://youtu.be/yahWPNE0C-k

Those who have worked up to Split Jumps know it is a tremendous power exercise.  It challenges balance and puts the individual in a split stance which has much more carryover to running and cutting on the athletic field.  Split Jumps can be increased in difficulty by adding load (DBs or KBs in the hands or a weight vest) or by elevating the back foot.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Broad Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Broad Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/iAmz2kyOx-0.

Broad jumps are a great movement for developing horizontal power/force production. Traditional Olympic Lifts emphasize vertical force with little carryover to sprinting/jumping.  Broad jumps emphasize speed though loading them can be difficult.  However, if you wish to progress the exercise and you have good mechanics, add a weight vest with a load of 10-20% of your body weight.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Box Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Box Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/LV9DH157nrU.

Although named box jumps, this exercise should technically be called box landings.  The point of a box jump is to introduce jumping and landing mechanics without the impact and force absorption of the landing that can lead to injury in many individuals.  The goal here should be to jump and land, softly, in the same position.  Once mastered, a one leg hop progression can be added.  Lastly, a traditional jump or hop can be used since your body will be ready to properly absorb the force of the movement.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Rotational Throws

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Rotational Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/HrbowSvJ9Ck.

This movement is one area where Med Balls trump traditional weightlifting movements.  While the Clean & Jerk and Snatch are very linear and bilateral (2 feet on the ground), the Med Ball Rotational Throw works on an often neglected rotational power component.  This is a must for golfers, and softball or baseball players.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Stepping Overhead Throw

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Stepping Overhead Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/bQgwLhw_HAM.

Much like the Med Ball chest pass, the Med Ball stepping overhead throw can be regressed to be much more stable for beginners or progressed to be much more dynamic and athletic in nature. This is a fantastic tool for any throwing athlete.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

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