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Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Wall Balls

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Wall Balls.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. You can view the video here: https://youtu.be/vCWu2gsCfU4.

If you are looking for a full body movement that offers the same triple extension (ankle, knee, hip) as the traditional weightlifting movements, then this exercise is for you.  Wall Balls focus on vertical power development.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Chest Pass

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Chest Pass.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/iN4qcOPe2vo

The Med Ball chest pass is a great exercise to build up horizontal pushing power.  It can be regressed to be stable, safe, and emphasize the upper body musculature, or progressed to be very dynamic and athletic in nature.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts

Do We Really Need Them?

I had my first introduction to Weightlifting (often referred to as Olympic lifting) in my high school football days using the Bigger Faster Stronger program.  Power Cleans were a staple of this program and the Power Snatch was also introduced to us during a clinic our football coach put together.  Over the last several years, weightlifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  These movements include the Snatch (bringing the bar from the floor to overhead in one fluid movement), the Clean & Jerk (bringing the bar from the floor to overhead in two distinct movements), and their derivatives.  Though there are several reasons to include these movements in programs, there are far more reasons, in my professional opinion, not to.

The primary reason one would or should be using Olympic lifting movements is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD).  RFD is a primary determinant of success in many sports.  This is what allows you to accelerate quickly, jump higher/farther, and change direction quickly.  There are volumes of research on the Clean & Jerk, Snatch, and their variations which demonstrate that these movements work very well at improving power and RFD; however, these lifts are not the only means of accomplishing this.  Moreover, there are multiple reasons not to incorporate them:

Time

Weightlifting movements are incredibly technical and take massive amounts of time to learn and perform correctly.  Most successful weightlifters at the international level have spent decades learning and perfecting their craft.  It is not uncommon to see weightlifters performing upwards of 10-12 training sessions per week.  The only other sport I can think of that takes this level of technical prowess is gymnastics.  While this is admirable for those choosing to compete in these sports, the level of time commitment is not practical for the average fitness enthusiast.

Safety

Due to the speed and dynamic nature of the Olympic lifts, there is a much higher probability of something going wrong.  Additionally, the vast majority of the fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises. In some fitness circles, you will see these movements programmed in for very high repetitions.  When this happens, you are ramping up fatigue which makes proper technique/form nearly impossible and minimizes power/RFD adaptation which is the whole point of these exercises. These lifts should be programmed at 1-5 rep sets with 2-5 minute rest intervals between.

Efficiency

For most people, time is a constant barrier to improved fitness.  For competitive athletes, they must balance the demands of sport practice, strength training, conditioning, skill practice, and recovery.  For this reason, the primary goal of a quality program should be to maximize efficiency of training.  Due to the mobility demands and speed of the movements, the warm ups required can take 15-20 minutes.  Combine that with the longer rest periods required and you barely have time to get in enough quality work to see optimal adaptations.  It is not uncommon for a weightlifter to take 90-120 minutes to complete a workout.

You may be asking yourself how to maximize power if you can’t perform the Olympic lifts.  Many people feel these movements are imperative for optimal fitness and performance.  In February of 2017, I traveled to Ohio State University where I heard the head Strength and Conditioning coaches for the New York Jets, San Francisco 49ers, and Arizona Cardinals speak.  None of them use Olympic lifts with their athletes.  If arguably the top athletes in the world don’t need these movements, then I think the rest of the population can get away without using them as well.

Over the next several weeks, I will introduce fourteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Stay tuned for exercise descriptions and video demonstration.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

Movement You Should Master

Push Ups

Modern medicine is keeping us alive longer, so now we need to put some effort into staying lively longer.  Mastering specific movements will improve our quality of life and help us stay independent and injury-free. I have come up with several exercises you can use to make yourself stronger, more durable, and develop a healthier, more functional body.  An exercise that requires no equipment and has bountiful benefits is the Push Up.

Push Ups

Push ups strengthen the pecs, deltoids, triceps.  They also allow free movement of the shoulder blades (unlike the bench press) and build stability in the core if done properly.  There is no need to get overly fancy with these.  If you can’t do a true push up with your chest touching the ground and your core locked in, start by elevating your hands instead of resorting to “girl” push ups on your knees.  Guys should try to work up to 3 sets of 20 reps at least a couple of times/week.  Women should strive for at least 10 reps but by no means need to stop there.  Watch the video and give it a try: https://youtu.be/7oQ-_J8FjEU

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

Movement You Should Master

Deadlifts

Modern medicine is keeping us alive longer, so now we need to put some effort into staying lively longer.  Mastering specific movements will improve our quality of life and help us stay independent and injury-free. I have come up with several exercises you can use to make yourself stronger, more durable, and develop a healthier, more functional body.  An exercise that I have found to be essential for overall strength is the Deadlift.

Deadlifts

At some point in your week, you will need to pick something up off the ground.  If you have ever moved furniture or loaded your push mower into the back of your car for repairs, you have seen the value in this task.

Deadlifts are an amazing exercise to work the quads, calves, hamstrings, glutes, core, and entire back all the way up to the traps and forearms.  As useful as deadlifts are, they are also one of the most butchered exercises in the gym.  I would highly recommend the help of a skilled professional and/or a mirror before implementing this movement into your routine.  I find that for the general fitness population, 2-3 deadlift variations are all you need for the bulk of your training.  Watch the video and give them a try:

1) One Leg Romanian Deadlift (mimics picking up smaller items around the house or yard; minimizes shear forces on the spine)

2) Hex Bar Deadlifts (great for maximal strength and the occasion when you have to pick up something really heavy) Note: This version offers virtually all of the benefits of a barbell deadlift with slightly more freedom for individual anatomical differences and slightly lower shear forces on your spine.

View video of deadlifts: https://youtu.be/CRbbXOMSeww

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

Renegade Rows and SHELC

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.  

Renegade Row-SHELC Combo

Renegade Rows
The renegade row starts in the top position of a push up.  Rubber hex dumbbells work the best for this exercise since they do not move on the floor.  Place the dumbbells on the floor and position the hands on top of the dumbbells.  Try to align the dumbbells directly under the armpits.  Maintain a strong grip on the dumbbell handle during the exercise.  Spread the feet at least shoulder width.  Tighten the shoulder blades down the back and create total body tension.   Without allowing the torso to turn, row one dumbbell up so the thumb approaches the armpit.  Lower the dumbbell in a controlled manner and repeat with the other arm.  Perform five repetitions on each arm.

Supine Hip Extension Leg Curls
shelcSet the TRX straps so the bottom of the strap is at the mid-calf level of your leg.  Lay supine and place the heels in the foot straps of the TRX.  The feet should be directly under the overhead attachment point of the TRX.  Place the arms on the floor at a 45 degree angle.  Brace the abdominal muscles and keep the head down.  Push the arms against the floor for stability.  Lift the hips off the floor and keep them up for the duration of the set.  Bend the knees so that the feet travel toward the body.  Keep the hips up and extend the knees in a controlled manner.  Perform ten to fifteen repetitions.  Common mistakes are turning the feet outward and allowing the hips to fall toward the floor as the knees flex and extend.

The anti-flexion and anti-rotation core stabilization demand created by this pair of exercises produces some interesting next day abdominal muscle soreness.  The ability to link the hips to the shoulder and produce movement is what everyone tries to accomplish with functional training.  Move through three sets of the Renegade Row – SHELC combo and let me know how it goes.

View video of Mike performing these exercises here: https://youtu.be/2_fT0zShTSo

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

PDFThis month’s issue has information on the lumbopelvic hip complex including written/video exercises.  Mike O’Hara also gives information on unstable pressing exercises to improve posture and improve motor control and symmetry.  Also read about the Becoming Unstoppable clinic for athletes 13 years and older that will be help April 30th at Fenton Fitness.

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The Man with the Missing Butt

There is an epidemic currently going on in men of all ages in our country. Virtually everywhere you go, you see men with sagging pants and exposed back sides. There are two major culprits of this unpleasant scene: an underdeveloped gluteus maximus muscle and an overly large gut. The latter is best dealt with in the kitchen, but the former can be vastly improved through proper resistance training. Perhaps the biggest problem with this issue is that many men don’t even care about it and are pre-occupied with “show muscles” like arms, shoulders, and pecs. This is a shame as Shakira was right on the money when she sang “the hips don’t lie.”

The Gluteus Maximus is the largest single muscle in the entire body and is the most dominant muscle on the hips. The glutes are also responsible for more actions than any other muscle group in the body. They extend the hips, adduct the femur, externally rotate the femur, and posteriorly tilt the hips. Strong and large glutes are distinctly correlated with reduced low back pain and reduced knee pain. If reduced pain isn’t enough motivation to get serious about training, your glutes’ improved performance will motivate you. Bret Contreras (recent PhD student and creator of the Hip Thruster) has single handedly shaped our knowledge of the glutes with his research in this area.

The glutes play the most important role in horizontal acceleration and speed. If you want to improve your sprinting times, getting stronger and bigger glutes is the absolute best way to shave time off your 40 yard dash. I think many athletes would greatly benefit from doing less “speed” training/camps and spend more time focusing on getting bigger and stronger glutes. Our hips are essential for virtually all athletic movements: throwing a ball, swinging a bat/golf club, punching, kicking, etc. all produce or transfer the majority of their energy through the hips. Ask any wrestler and he will tell you that controlling your opponent’s hips controls your opponent. Here are my two favorite exercises for building size and strength in the glutes:

Hip Thrust: The Hip Thrust has been demonstrated in research to be the single best exercise for maximally stimulating the glutes, and unlike most other exercises, it gets the most stimulation at the fully contracted position of full hip extension. Again, this exercise has been shown to be one of the best tools for shaving seconds off your 40 yard dash time. The most important aspect of this lift is that it allows for progressively heavier loads for a lifetime.

Rear_Foot_Elevated_man

Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat: The Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat is a great exercise that improves single leg balance, improves/challenges hip mobility by putting one hip leg into flexion and the other into extension, and works the glute most where it is fully stretched (the opposite of the Hip Thrust). As with the Hip Thrust, this exercise allows for progressively heavier loads over time.
Add these exercises, along with a focus on overall glute strength to your program, and say goodbye to sagging pants, knee/back pain, and watch your power/acceleration increase.

Click on the link below for video demonstration of the hip thrust and rear foot elevated split squat:
-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

Jeff_Tirrell_Video

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