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Falling Facts

NY Times Article on Fall Prevention

When discussing fitness goals, most people never mention fall prevention, but I suggest that it is more important than fat loss or improving your cardiovascular capacity.  Please take the time to read Gretchen Reynolds excellent article; Falls Can Kill You. Here’s How to Minimize the Risk.  In the article, Ms. Reynolds presents several good lifestyle modifications and medication precautions that will help prevent a fall.  Try adding some of my long standing fall prevention training tips.

Exercise in a standing position. 

If your goal is to move better and remain free of injury, then 90% of your exercise activity should be performed in standing.  Developing better kinesthetic awareness, strength, and coordination in a standing posture is the crucial component of training that prevents a fall.  During my visits to commercial gyms, most of the exercise activity I witness is performed in a supine, seated, or supported position.

Practice moving in all directions.

Fall prevention training involves improving multi-directional movement skills.  Most falls happen from an unexpected disruption of your equilibrium.  You get pushed to one side, twisted off center, or a foot slides from under the body.  Most gym activities are predominantly sagittal plane- forward and backward.  We need to be able to move well in all directions.

Practice moving faster.

Fall reaction training should focus on exercise activities that make you quicker.  Research on falls has shown that a gait pattern (how you walk) that starts to slow down is the best predictor for a future fall.  Agility ladder footwork, medicine ball throws, and hurdle drills are examples of faster paced training activities.  Yoga, Pilates, recumbent bicycle riding, and muscle isolation exercises will not make you better at moving faster.

Stand on one leg.

A simple and proven fall prevention activity is single leg stance balance training.  Single leg balance is a skill that tends to deteriorate with age, injury, and a sedentary lifestyle.  Stand on one leg for twenty seconds.  Stand on one leg and turn your head side to side.  Stand on one leg and then close your eyes.

Practice getting up and down off the floor. 

One of the best anti fall training activities is consistent practice of getting up and down off the floor.  Moving gracefully from standing to the floor and back up again is a life skill that keeps you independent and safe.  As a Physical Therapist, I frequently find people who are very impaired in this basic task of mobility.  They crawl to a piece of furniture for an assist and transition from the floor in an unsteady and unsafe manner.  Most of these patients are not elderly, they are tight, weak, and deconditioned.

Perform single leg strength training. 

We are monopods.  We absorb and then create force one leg at a time.  During activities of daily living, one leg is loaded more than the other.  It only makes sense that we train our legs the same way we use them.  Work with a trainer and learn how to perform step ups, single leg squats, rear foot elevated split squats, single leg deadlifts…

Become a better shock absorber.

Fall events often occur because of an impact.  The force of the impact causes our body to give in to gravity and down we go.  Just like any other physical attribute, impact resilience can be trained.  Mat work, medicine ball throws, and rope drills are some of the activities that can be used to improve impact resilience.

Make balance practice a daily event.

Integrate anti-fall training into your lifestyle.  Stand on one leg while you brush your teeth–right leg thirty seconds then left leg thirty seconds.  Perform multi directional exercise as movement preparation before a bike ride or run.  Get some instruction on a program of exercise that improves agility, single leg strength, and power production.

Someday, somehow, and when you least expect it, you are going to have an unplanned interaction with gravity.  Your fitness program should make you more responsive to a fall event and less likely to be injured.

Link to article: here

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

In the April 2018 issue, Mike O’Hara discusses the benefits of the farmer’s walk exercise. Jeff Tirrell tells you how to reduce injury to your ligaments and tendons, and tips are given for getting back out into the garden.

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Progression Know How

Carries, Crawls, and Core

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Carries, Crawls, and Core

Push Up Position Plank: Goal of 1 minute

Plank: Goal of 30 seconds

Side Plank: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Side Plank w/ outside foot elevated: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Side Plank w/ inside leg elevated: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Anterior Baby Crawl: goal of 15 yards with stable torso

Anterior Crawl: Goal of 30 yards with stable torso

Farmers Walk: Goal of 60 yards with body weight

Turkish Get Up (¼): Goal of 8/6kg (men/women) for 10 reps/side

Turkish Get Up (½): Goal of 10/12kg (men/women) for 6 reps/side

Turkish Get Up (full): Goal of 25% body weight for 4 reps/side.

See video demonstration of these exercises here: https://youtu.be/5OkXbOWx4mw

Progression Know How

Vertical Pull Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Vertical Pull Patterns

X Pulldowns: Goal of 50% bodyweight for 10 reps

Isometric Pull/Chin up holds: Goal of holding for 1 minute at both the top and bottom position

Eccentric Pull/Chin ups: Goal of 10 eccentric reps with a 3-5 second descent

Pull/Chin ups: Goal of 10/5 reps (men/women)

See video demonstration at: https://youtu.be/Xidv7HlNtWE

 

In the February issue of our newsletter, Mike O’Hara discusses ways to improve hip mobility and strength.  Read Jeff Tirrell’s article on why dairy products may actually be good for you.  Having back pain doesn’t mean you can’t have a fitness program.

Download Here

Progression Know How

Horizontal Pull Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Horizontal Pull Patterns

TRX Row: Goal 45 degree angle for 10 reps

One Arm DB Row: Goal of 50% bodyweight for 10 reps per arm

Inverted TRX Rows: Goal of 10 reps with full range of motion

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Progression Know How

Vertical Press Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Vertical Press Patterns

Tall Kneeling Bilateral Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 10 reps (men), 25# for 10 reps (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 5 reps/arm (men), 25# for 5 reps/arm (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm KB Overhead Press- Goal of 20kg for 5 reps/arm (men), 12kg for 5 reps/arm (women)

Standing 1 arm DB/KB Overhead Press- Goal of 25% bodyweight for 10 reps/arm

Barbell Overhead Press- Goal of bodyweight for 1 rep (men), or 75% bodyweight for 1 rep (women)

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Progression Know How

Horizontal Press Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Horizontal Press Patterns

Push Ups- Goal of 20/10 reps (male/female) with chest touching floor.

Alternating DB Bench Press- Goal of 50% body weight per arm for 5 reps/arm (men) or 33% body weight per arm for 5 reps/arm (women).

Bench Press- Goal of 75% bodyweight (women) or bodyweight (men) for 3-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: View Video

Progression Know How

Hinge Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Hinge Patterns

KB Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps with 40kg (88lbs)

Single Leg Reaching Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with perfect form

Single Leg Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with 50% of bodyweight

Trap Bar Deadlift- Goal of 2x bodyweight (men) or 1.5x bodyweight (women) for 3-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: Hinge Pattern Video

In the January 2018 issue, Mike O’Hara focuses on strengthening your hamstrings.  Exercises to make your hamstrings stronger, not longer are given along with video demonstration.  Jeff Tirrell tells us how to make incremental changes in our diets to see positive changes, and the spotlight is on Fenton Fitness member, Robin Forstat–a nationally ranked power lifter.
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