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landmine

Progression Know How

Horizontal Pull Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Horizontal Pull Patterns

TRX Row: Goal 45 degree angle for 10 reps

One Arm DB Row: Goal of 50% bodyweight for 10 reps per arm

Inverted TRX Rows: Goal of 10 reps with full range of motion

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Progression Know How

Vertical Press Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Vertical Press Patterns

Tall Kneeling Bilateral Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 10 reps (men), 25# for 10 reps (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 5 reps/arm (men), 25# for 5 reps/arm (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm KB Overhead Press- Goal of 20kg for 5 reps/arm (men), 12kg for 5 reps/arm (women)

Standing 1 arm DB/KB Overhead Press- Goal of 25% bodyweight for 10 reps/arm

Barbell Overhead Press- Goal of bodyweight for 1 rep (men), or 75% bodyweight for 1 rep (women)

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Landmine_RainbowThe muscles in the middle of your body are designed to prevent excessive motion in the spinal column, pelvic girdle and rib cage. As a team, these muscles work to produce an isometric hold—a pillar effect that transfers force through the legs to the arms. A very effective anti-lateral flexion and anti rotation core stabilization exercise is the landmine rainbow.

How the Core Muscles Work
If the goal of a fitness program is to produce carry over to better function in real life activities, then the training has to happen in an upright position. The function of the core muscles is to hold the middle of your body still as the arms and legs move. A sprinter must keep his spine and pelvic girdle stable as the limbs move and transfer forces into the ground to propel the body through space. When you lift the groceries out of the car, your spine must stay stable as you use your legs to lift and carry the bags into the house. Landmine rainbows train core stability in a standing functional position.

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A Landmine is a modification on the use of an Olympic bar. The bar is anchored onto the floor at one end with a Landmine device and you lift the free end of the bar with a load of your Landmine_Ichoosing. At FFAC, we have five landmine set ups that can be used with either a standard 45 pound Olympic bar or a 15 pound training bar. These are the reasons to use a Landmine.

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Exercise Of The Week–Kneeling, One Arm Landmine Press

ACTIVITY GOAL:
Improve vertical pressing strength. Increase core and shoulder stability.

OBJECTIVE:
Strengthen the shoulders, triceps, abdominals, and obliques. Increase neurological control of shoulder girdle and core musculature.

STARTING POSITION:
Kneel down (one knee with one foot planted) at the end of the barbell (positioned in landmine). Pick up the end of the barbell with the hand on the same side as the knee that is down. Your hand should almost be touching your shoulder at the start.

PROCEDURE:
Firmly grasp the end of the barbell, brace your core (by inhaling and expanding your abdomen) and extend your arm pressing the bar away. Repeat on the other side.

COMMON MISTAKES:
Starting with your hand/end of the barbell too far away from your shoulder. Not extending your arm all the way. Not bracing the core. Allowing flexion or extension of the hip joint.

Jeff Tirrell, B.S., CSCS

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