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8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#8–Deloading

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#8–Deloading

Deloading is a term used to describe an intentional period of time (usually 1-2 weeks) where intensity and/or volume are reduced in training.  In some cases, no training at all is performed (though this is probably not optimal, unless you are injured).  In my experience, this is usually not an issue with the majority of clients.  Most people end up missing time at the gym due to illness, work, kid’s activities, vacation, etc.  If you happen to be somebody that is highly dedicated to your training and don’t ever miss any period longer than a week in the gym, then a scheduled deloading period may be needed.  I usually recommend reducing training volume by 40-60%, and intensity by 10-20%.  In practice for a one week deload, this would look something like this:

Normal Week                                                                                     Deload Week

45 total weekly training sets of all exercises                                      24 total weekly training sets

e.g. squats: 200lbs lifted                                                                     squats: 160-180lbs lifted

If you don’t ever miss time in the gym in a 12 month period, I would recommend the following deload schedule for people who train 3, 4, or 5 times per week.  As mentioned earlier, training more than 5 times per week is likely not feasible for most adults, and less than 3 doesn’t warrant a deload period.

3 days per week: deload for 1 week, 1 time each year

4 days per week: deload for 1 week, 2 times each year

5 days per week: deloa for 1 week, 3 times each year

 

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#7–Program Hopping

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#7-Program Hopping

As stated initially, any new exercise or activity added to a program will produce a novel stimulus that will almost always lead to some level of soreness.  Many individuals change their workout every day and never give themselves a chance to adapt.  Many people enjoy the feeling of being sore as they associate that with progress.  However, when you look at research, most of the gains in lean body mass actually occur 2-4 weeks into training after the majority of initial soreness has subsided.  It should be remembered that strength training is a skill.  It must be practiced.  It is recommended that the majority of your exercise selection remain basically the same for at least 3 weeks.  Workouts can be varied by the number of sets, reps, weight lifted, or time to completion.  After 3-12 weeks with a given exercise, you can switch it out if you are bored or no longer able to progress the aforementioned variables.

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#6–Training Frequency

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#6-Training Frequency

The cold hard truth is that when we are younger, we recover quicker.  I remember when I first started training in 1998 (8th grade), I would train 6 days per week for 90-120 minutes.  I got bigger, stronger, and rarely felt overtrained.  There was a time in the summer my junior and senior year where I would train 6 days per week, and on 3 of those days. I would actually lift 2 separate times accounting for roughly 12 hours of training each week.  Even at this time, I still made great progress.  It wasn’t until my sophomore year of college that my 6 day per week plan was just more than my body could keep up with.  I scaled things back to 5x/week and did just fine again.  Once I started having kids and sleep got limited, the stress of providing for a family became real and I had to scale back to 4 days per week.  I find that most adult clients over the age of 40 can only tolerate 3-4 days per week.  There’s nothing that says you can’t train back to back days.  However, if you are always sore, and don’t feel that you’ve recovered, you may need to give yourself some extra days for recovery.

 

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#5 Training Volume

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#5-Training Volume

When referring to training volume, we are typically talking about one of two things.  Total number of sets performed in a given session, week, or month is one way to look to volume.  Another way to look at volume is as volume load.  Volume load is calculated as weight lifted x sets x reps.  So, if you lifted 100 pounds for 3 sets of 10 reps, your volume would be 3 sets, but your volume load would be 3000lbs (100 x 3 x 10).  Simply looking at volume (total sets performed) is a better way to compare different individual’s workloads.  Volume load is very relative depending on an individual’s training background, strength, etc.  If training volume gets too high, then you may be outworking what your body is capable of recovering from.  I find that most adult clients over the age of 40 struggle to handle more than 24 total sets in a single session or more than 72 sets in a given week.  There are some who can handle more than this, and some who struggle to recover from volumes half of this.  When increasing volume, it can be helpful to look at volume load for an individual and try not to increase by more than 5-10% in a given week.

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#4 Carbohydrates

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#4–Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the primary nutrients that drive insulin secretion.  Insulin is an anabolic hormone that drives protein and fat into cells where these nutrients are used to repair tissue.  Though there are other pathways that do allow protein and fat to make their way into the cell, they are not as quick or efficient.  Carbohydrates are also stored as glycogen in the muscles, which is the body’s preferred fuel source at higher intensity exercise levels.  Carbohydrate levels can vary greatly depending on activity levels, goals, and training frequency.  Most people will operate best on a minimum carbohydrate intake of 100 grams per day.  Ideally, these are coming primarily from fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, beans, and whole grains.

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#3 Protein

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#3–Protein

Protein is responsible for making up at least part of every structure in all humans.  It is responsible for the repair of muscles, tendons, ligaments, and organs.  Protein is most commonly found in animal products such as meats, eggs, and dairy.  Despite popular belief, vegetarian dairy substitutes (such as almond milk) tend to be a poor source of protein.  Soy and pea along with a variety of vegetable-based protein powders are the best bet for vegans to increase protein intake.  For optimal recovery, protein intakes should range from 0.62 grams per pound of bodyweight up to 1 gram per pound of body weight.  For very lean individuals who are very active or trying to lose body fat, amounts may need to be even higher.  Protein intakes of up to 2 grams per pound of bodyweight have been studied and found to be safe in healthy individuals.

8 Reasons Why You’re Sore–#2 Hydration

One of the most common complaints I get from new trainees (most often these come from middle aged men who are just now getting back into strength training) is that of being sore all of the time.  Many people associate muscular soreness with getting a good workout or getting results.  However, the research does not necessarily support this thought process.  Muscles tend to get sore anytime a new stimulus is introduced (new exercise, activity, etc), but this should typically subside within 2-3 weeks of starting the activity.  Anytime a new exercise is introduced, it is expected that some level of soreness will occur.  However, a good program will actually have an introduction phase where weight and volume are intentionally reduced in order to avoid excessive soreness, as this can negatively impact future workouts.  If you are chronically sore beyond the initial 2-3 weeks of starting a strength training program, there are eight areas that you may need to pay attention to.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

#2–Hydration

Hydration or water intake is probably one of the easiest ways to improve health, recovery, and performance.  For most people in the general population, we want to focus on calorie free fluid with minimum caffeine (this means water).  Water acts as a solvent, transporter, catalyst, lubricant, temperature regulator, mineral source, and assists in anabolic processes.  Water helps bring nutrients to cells and removes waste.  It is used in the production of proteins and glycogen, helps facilitate and speed up many chemical reactions (many wouldn’t occur without it.  It also lubricates joints and acts as a shock absorber for our eyes and the spine.  Water intake should range from 1 Liter per 1000 calories consumed (need to know your caloric consumption) up to ½ ounce per pound of bodyweight.  In very hot or humid conditions or when activity is very high, larger amounts may be needed.

Practical Protein

During the last five years, I’ve probably written about protein more than any other topic.  That’s largely due to the fact that along with energy intake, water intake, and a solid progressive full body strength program, very little else will have such a dramatic impact on your progress, recovery, and body composition.  Most people who read fitness articles and are regular readers of our blog understand that they need to eat protein.  My experience in nutrition coaching however, shows that many people are clueless as to how to go about this.

For starters, we need to understand what our protein intake should look like.  Many studies look at minimum requirements.  This outlook is simply looking at what is needed to avoid sickness and disease.  What we want to look at is optimal intakes to improve recovery and accumulate or retain muscle mass, as these are the metrics which will vastly improve our quality of life.  Most research in this field gives protein requirements in grams per kilogram of bodyweight.  The latest and most comprehensive Meta-analysis recommends an intake of 0.73g/lb of bodyweight.  Dr. Eric Helms presents various good points in this article which shows intakes may be able to go as low as 0.63g/lb of bodyweight and some may benefit from as high as 1.3g/lb of bodyweight.  Since most people that I talk to about protein intake are struggling to get enough, I recommend 0.6-1g/lb of bodyweight.  Leaner individuals likely need to be on the higher end, while obese and overweight individuals will probably fair just fine on the lower end.  Once you know your intake goals, you simply need to divide that amount among the number of meals you eat per day.  Here is a practical guide, with simple options if you are still under on your protein intake.  These meals can be scaled up or down based on your protein needs and will also fulfill fruit and veggie requirements for the day.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Snack Option #1

2 oz beef/turkey/venison jerky (20-25g protein, 140-180 calories)

Snack Option #2

1 scoop Whey OR Egg OR Pea protein shake (20-25g protein, 120-140 calories)

Snack Option #3

3 string cheese OR 3 hard boiled Eggs (18g protein, 150-210 calories)

Daily Totals: 108-250g protein (1140-2631 calories)

 

Practical Protein

During the last five years, I’ve probably written about protein more than any other topic.  That’s largely due to the fact that along with energy intake, water intake, and a solid progressive full body strength program, very little else will have such a dramatic impact on your progress, recovery, and body composition.  Most people who read fitness articles and are regular readers of our blog understand that they need to eat protein.  My experience in nutrition coaching however, shows that many people are clueless as to how to go about this.

For starters, we need to understand what our protein intake should look like.  Many studies look at minimum requirements.  This outlook is simply looking at what is needed to avoid sickness and disease.  What we want to look at is optimal intakes to improve recovery and accumulate or retain muscle mass, as these are the metrics which will vastly improve our quality of life.  Most research in this field gives protein requirements in grams per kilogram of bodyweight.  The latest and most comprehensive Meta-analysis recommends an intake of 0.73g/lb of bodyweight.  Dr. Eric Helms presents various good points in this article which shows intakes may be able to go as low as 0.63g/lb of bodyweight and some may benefit from as high as 1.3g/lb of bodyweight.  Since most people that I talk to about protein intake are struggling to get enough, I recommend 0.6-1g/lb of bodyweight.  Leaner individuals likely need to be on the higher end, while obese and overweight individuals will probably fair just fine on the lower end.  Once you know your intake goals, you simply need to divide that amount among the number of meals you eat per day.  Here is a practical guide, with simple options if you are still under on your protein intake.  These meals can be scaled up or down based on your protein needs and will also fulfill fruit and veggie requirements for the day.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Dinner Option #1

2-3 cups of spinach AND/OR Kale (2-4g protein, good for you)

4-6 ounces chicken breast OR Tuna (25-44g protein)

1 ounce shredded cheese (5-8g protein, calcium)

½-1 cup other veggies: broccoli, carrots, cucumbers, pepper, onion (1-2g protein, good for you)

2 tbsp oil/vinegar based dressing (no protein)

Optional:          Glass of 2% or Whole milk (8g protein)

glass of red wine

bread or potato

Total: 33-68g protein (450-700 calories)

 

Dinner Option #2

4-8oz baked Chicken breast, Salmon, Steak (25-65g protein)

1 medium baked potato OR 1 cup quinoa OR 1 cup rice (2-6g protein)

2 cups  green beans, asparagus, brussel sprouts (4-6g protein, good for you)

Optional:          Glass of 2% or Whole milk (8g protein)

glass of red wine

Total: 31-84g protein (360-860 calories)

 

Learn how to keep your spinal stabilizers strong by performing side planks.  Mike O’Hara explains this in his article, “Learning to Lean”, and includes video demonstration and explanation of the importance keeping your stabilizers strong to stand up to the demands of daily life. It’s time for another Fenton Fitness Love Your Jeans Challenge–see page 3 for more information. In his article, “The Periodization of Nutrition”, Jeff Tirrell gives tips on optimizing dietary intake.

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