(810) 750-1996 PH
Fenton Fitness (810) 750-0351 PH
Fenton Physical Therapy (810) 750-1996 PH
Linden Physical Therapy (810) 735-0010 PH
Milford Physical Therapy (248) 685-7272 PH

Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

increase

Practical Protein

During the last five years, I’ve probably written about protein more than any other topic.  That’s largely due to the fact that along with energy intake, water intake, and a solid progressive full body strength program, very little else will have such a dramatic impact on your progress, recovery, and body composition.  Most people who read fitness articles and are regular readers of our blog understand that they need to eat protein.  My experience in nutrition coaching however, shows that many people are clueless as to how to go about this.

For starters, we need to understand what our protein intake should look like.  Many studies look at minimum requirements.  This outlook is simply looking at what is needed to avoid sickness and disease.  What we want to look at is optimal intakes to improve recovery and accumulate or retain muscle mass, as these are the metrics which will vastly improve our quality of life.  Most research in this field gives protein requirements in grams per kilogram of bodyweight.  The latest and most comprehensive Meta-analysis recommends an intake of 0.73g/lb of bodyweight.  Dr. Eric Helms presents various good points in this article which shows intakes may be able to go as low as 0.63g/lb of bodyweight and some may benefit from as high as 1.3g/lb of bodyweight.  Since most people that I talk to about protein intake are struggling to get enough, I recommend 0.6-1g/lb of bodyweight.  Leaner individuals likely need to be on the higher end, while obese and overweight individuals will probably fair just fine on the lower end.  Once you know your intake goals, you simply need to divide that amount among the number of meals you eat per day.  Here is a practical guide, with simple options if you are still under on your protein intake.  These meals can be scaled up or down based on your protein needs and will also fulfill fruit and veggie requirements for the day.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Snack Option #1

2 oz beef/turkey/venison jerky (20-25g protein, 140-180 calories)

Snack Option #2

1 scoop Whey OR Egg OR Pea protein shake (20-25g protein, 120-140 calories)

Snack Option #3

3 string cheese OR 3 hard boiled Eggs (18g protein, 150-210 calories)

Daily Totals: 108-250g protein (1140-2631 calories)

 

Practical Protein

During the last five years, I’ve probably written about protein more than any other topic.  That’s largely due to the fact that along with energy intake, water intake, and a solid progressive full body strength program, very little else will have such a dramatic impact on your progress, recovery, and body composition.  Most people who read fitness articles and are regular readers of our blog understand that they need to eat protein.  My experience in nutrition coaching however, shows that many people are clueless as to how to go about this.

For starters, we need to understand what our protein intake should look like.  Many studies look at minimum requirements.  This outlook is simply looking at what is needed to avoid sickness and disease.  What we want to look at is optimal intakes to improve recovery and accumulate or retain muscle mass, as these are the metrics which will vastly improve our quality of life.  Most research in this field gives protein requirements in grams per kilogram of bodyweight.  The latest and most comprehensive Meta-analysis recommends an intake of 0.73g/lb of bodyweight.  Dr. Eric Helms presents various good points in this article which shows intakes may be able to go as low as 0.63g/lb of bodyweight and some may benefit from as high as 1.3g/lb of bodyweight.  Since most people that I talk to about protein intake are struggling to get enough, I recommend 0.6-1g/lb of bodyweight.  Leaner individuals likely need to be on the higher end, while obese and overweight individuals will probably fair just fine on the lower end.  Once you know your intake goals, you simply need to divide that amount among the number of meals you eat per day.  Here is a practical guide, with simple options if you are still under on your protein intake.  These meals can be scaled up or down based on your protein needs and will also fulfill fruit and veggie requirements for the day.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Dinner Option #1

2-3 cups of spinach AND/OR Kale (2-4g protein, good for you)

4-6 ounces chicken breast OR Tuna (25-44g protein)

1 ounce shredded cheese (5-8g protein, calcium)

½-1 cup other veggies: broccoli, carrots, cucumbers, pepper, onion (1-2g protein, good for you)

2 tbsp oil/vinegar based dressing (no protein)

Optional:          Glass of 2% or Whole milk (8g protein)

glass of red wine

bread or potato

Total: 33-68g protein (450-700 calories)

 

Dinner Option #2

4-8oz baked Chicken breast, Salmon, Steak (25-65g protein)

1 medium baked potato OR 1 cup quinoa OR 1 cup rice (2-6g protein)

2 cups  green beans, asparagus, brussel sprouts (4-6g protein, good for you)

Optional:          Glass of 2% or Whole milk (8g protein)

glass of red wine

Total: 31-84g protein (360-860 calories)

 

Progression Know How

Carries, Crawls, and Core

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Carries, Crawls, and Core

Push Up Position Plank: Goal of 1 minute

Plank: Goal of 30 seconds

Side Plank: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Side Plank w/ outside foot elevated: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Side Plank w/ inside leg elevated: Goal of 30 seconds/side

Anterior Baby Crawl: goal of 15 yards with stable torso

Anterior Crawl: Goal of 30 yards with stable torso

Farmers Walk: Goal of 60 yards with body weight

Turkish Get Up (¼): Goal of 8/6kg (men/women) for 10 reps/side

Turkish Get Up (½): Goal of 10/12kg (men/women) for 6 reps/side

Turkish Get Up (full): Goal of 25% body weight for 4 reps/side.

See video demonstration of these exercises here: https://youtu.be/5OkXbOWx4mw

Progression Know How

Vertical Pull Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Vertical Pull Patterns

X Pulldowns: Goal of 50% bodyweight for 10 reps

Isometric Pull/Chin up holds: Goal of holding for 1 minute at both the top and bottom position

Eccentric Pull/Chin ups: Goal of 10 eccentric reps with a 3-5 second descent

Pull/Chin ups: Goal of 10/5 reps (men/women)

See video demonstration at: https://youtu.be/Xidv7HlNtWE

 

Progression Know How

Horizontal Pull Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Horizontal Pull Patterns

TRX Row: Goal 45 degree angle for 10 reps

One Arm DB Row: Goal of 50% bodyweight for 10 reps per arm

Inverted TRX Rows: Goal of 10 reps with full range of motion

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Progression Know How

Vertical Press Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Vertical Press Patterns

Tall Kneeling Bilateral Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 10 reps (men), 25# for 10 reps (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm Landmine Press- Goal of 45# for 5 reps/arm (men), 25# for 5 reps/arm (women)

½ Kneeling 1 arm KB Overhead Press- Goal of 20kg for 5 reps/arm (men), 12kg for 5 reps/arm (women)

Standing 1 arm DB/KB Overhead Press- Goal of 25% bodyweight for 10 reps/arm

Barbell Overhead Press- Goal of bodyweight for 1 rep (men), or 75% bodyweight for 1 rep (women)

Watch Jeff demonstrate these exercises: View Video

Progression Know How

Horizontal Press Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Horizontal Press Patterns

Push Ups- Goal of 20/10 reps (male/female) with chest touching floor.

Alternating DB Bench Press- Goal of 50% body weight per arm for 5 reps/arm (men) or 33% body weight per arm for 5 reps/arm (women).

Bench Press- Goal of 75% bodyweight (women) or bodyweight (men) for 3-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: View Video

Progression Know How

Hinge Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Hinge Patterns

KB Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps with 40kg (88lbs)

Single Leg Reaching Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with perfect form

Single Leg Deadlift- Goal of 10 reps/leg with 50% of bodyweight

Trap Bar Deadlift- Goal of 2x bodyweight (men) or 1.5x bodyweight (women) for 3-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: Hinge Pattern Video

Progression Know How

Squat Patterns

If I could kill a word it would be “workout”.  People who are into fitness love to talk about working out, but seldom do you hear people talk about training or practicing movements.  “Workout” tends to infer any form of structured exercise with the sole purpose of expending energy or making you tired.  It focuses on today and perhaps a feeling (tired, sore, or getting a pump, etc.), but has no thought of tomorrow.   Our focus at Fenton Fitness is always on training or practicing movements.  The focus is always on the future–reducing injury risk, becoming more durable, performing better at sports or life, or just feeling better.  Our focus is on skill acquisition, not feeling tired.  Just imagine if we treated education the way we treat exercise.  Think of the difficulty of  learning a new subject every day, rarely repeating something, with the sole purpose of making it difficult.  That would be crazy, yet that is more and more of what we see in the fitness industry.  In workouts, exercises tend to change just for the sake of changing.  In training, the movements are not random and serve a direct purpose, and are therefore performed for a minimum of 3-4 weeks.  We progress these movements by performing them with more control, increasing the number of sets or reps, increasing load, or reducing rest intervals.  Here are some benchmarks that we like to use with some basic exercises to do before progressing on to the next movement.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Squat Patterns:

Goblet Box Squat- Goal is 50% body weight down to a 12” box for 10 reps (if under 5’2” go to 10”, if over 6’ 2” go to 14” box)

Goblet Split Squat- Goal is 50% body weight for 10 reps/leg

Rear Foot Elevated Goblet Split Squat- Goal is 50% body weight for 10 reps/leg

Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat w/DBs at sides- Goal of 100% body weight for 10 reps/leg

One Leg Squat- Goal of 25% body weight down to 12” box for 5/leg (shorter or taller based off goblet box squat standards)

Front Squat- Goal of bodyweight for 10 reps

BB Back Squat- Goal of 1.5x bodyweight (women) or 2x bodyweight (men) for 2-5 reps

See video demonstration of these exercises here: https://youtu.be/vkrtWkNx8pg.

Fitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated.  Physical performance and recovery capacity is dramatically different.  If you need proof, look around for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL.  The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime.  I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client. 

Walk Your Way into a Better Gait Pattern

How well you move says more about your age and fitness level than any aspect of appearance. Walking is the fundamental functional activity we need to maintain in order to stay healthy and independent for a lifetime.  Your fitness program should make your gait more symmetrical, efficient, and graceful.

shutterstock_298057595Simple observation of gait patterns (how you walk) is one of the best evaluation tools a physical therapist has to lead him to the cause of your pain problems.  Restrictions in stance time, stride length, and propulsion with one side of the body create the stress that drives pain in the upper back and shoulder.  Limited torso rotation causes greater stress in the lower leg and early onset degenerative breakdown in the knee.  The tight hip that does not fully extend is the culprit behind your plantar fascitis.

Thirty years ago, a wise physical therapy instructor of mine told me my treatment program was only successful if it “enhances the patients’ ability to walk.”  Most fitness training is devoid of any activity that improves the gait pattern.  Despite more talk about “functional fitness,” the majority of training programs address the body as individual parts instead of an integrated whole.  Split (upper body on one day and lower on another) and body part training (arm day) artificially divides training stimulus and blunts the neural benefits exercise has on our movement skills.

Training that improves your gait pattern requires some open space and enlightened coaching.  Activities that improve your walk are taxing on the neural system, so they should be performed early in the training session.  The best results are achieved with consistent feedback and ongoing activity progressions.

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Categories