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Push Ups and Longevity

Recent Study is a Biomarker Reminder

Take a moment and read the recent New York Times article, How Many Push-Ups Can You Do? It May Be a Good Predictor of Heart Health. It appears that being able to perform well on a push up test is a better predictor of heart health than the traditional treadmill test.  The article postulates several reasons for the research results.  We only need to read the book Biomarkers for a thorough explanation.

In the book Drs. Evans and Rosenburg looked at the measurable “biomarkers” that keep humans healthy, independent, and fit over an entire life span.  They have determined the top four biomarkers are:

  1. Muscle Mass.  What percentage of your body is made of muscle.
  2. Strength.  Can you use that muscle to push, pull, lift and carry.
  3. Basal Metabolic Rate.  The number of calories your body expends at rest.
  4. Bodyfat Percentage.  What percentage of your body is composed of fat.

The authors named these top four biomarkers, the decisive tetrad.  They are the prerequisites to maintaining healthy numbers in all of the other essential biomarkers.

  1. Aerobic Capacity
  2. Blood Sugar Tolerance
  3. Cholesterol / HDL ratio
  4. Blood Pressure
  5. Bone Density
  6. Internal Body Temperature Regulation

Push up proficiency requires muscle mass, strength, and a minimal amount of extra load to lift in the form of bodyfat.  Those three traits are all a part of the decisive tetrad. To age well, stay durable–no injuries, and maintain control of all health parameters–we need to maintain or improve muscle mass / strength and not avoid extra bodyfat.  An ongoing program of strength training and nutritional discipline are the foremost components of fitness and health.

Now get on the floor and give me twenty.

View the article here.

Michael O’Hara PT, OCS, CSCS

That pain in your arm or hand could be coming from somewhere else.  Read Mike O’Hara’s article, Changing Locations to find out more.  Jeff Tirrell gives nutrition tips and Mike discusses the benefits of using an agility ladder.

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Stay independent longer by increasing your stair climbing capacity.  Mike O’Hara shows you how in his article, “Keep Climbing”.  Mike also discusses standing desks and the many benefits of standing while working.  Jeff Tirrell explains the effect of exercise on appetite.

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Our June issue brings information on preventing neck pain by strengthening your neck.  Mike O’Hara describes and demonstrates in a video exercises that will help strengthen the muscles of your neck.  In another article, Mike tells how grip strength can be a predictor of early death in some patients.  Be sure to read Jeff Tirrell’s article on performance based training.

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In our May issue, Mike O’Hara discusses the importance of walking.  If you have pain or difficulty with walking, there are things that help.  Mike demonstrates some exercises to get you ready.  Be sure to read Jeff Tirrell’s article on squatting, and read about Afterburn–a new class at Fenton Fitness that uses heart rate monitors while training.

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Intensity Know How

Exercise Intensity Is a Mystery For Most Fitness Clients

Cheryl trained in the gym three days a week and went to yoga class twice a week.  At the gym she used the elliptical machine for thirty minutes and did the “ab circuit”.  The yoga classes lasted an hour and she was always very tired after a session.  Despite six months of this program, she had not lost any fat and her blood pressure remained elevated.  After recovering from a heel pain problem, Cheryl began training at Fenton Fitness.  After her first session, it was evident what was stopping Cheryl from reaching her goals.  She had no idea what constitutes effective exercise intensity.

Cheryl’s problem is not an uncommon one.  Many fitness participants overestimate how hard they are exercising.  What they perceive as a moderate or intense work level is actually a low exertion level.  As the body accommodates to the same exercise stress repeated day after day, the intensity level falls even further.  A recent article by Gretchen Reynolds in the June 12, 2014 issue of the New York Times discusses a recent study on the overestimation of exercise intensity.

Many fitness clients and rehab patients are not comfortable with being uncomfortable.  They stop an exercise activity well before they reach a level that will produce a training effect.  They require guidance and reassurance that the feelings they get when heart rate and body heat elevate are normal and necessary.  Heart rate monitors are often the solution for these clients.  Gradually introducing ten second intervals of exercise at 70% of age adjusted maximums on a bike or treadmill followed by a fifty second recovery will get the client accustomed to the feeling of more intense exercise.  Having the client wear a heart rate monitor while walking and monitoring sensation while making an effort to push up the rate with faster paces and uphill walks is effective.

Cheryl felt lightheaded and short of breath during her first five exercise sessions but, after using a heart rate monitor and becoming accustomed to the intensity of each session, she started feeling better.  Four months later, she was able to stop taking one of her blood pressure medications, and she had lost eight pounds.  Cheryl now knows what mild, moderate, and intense exercise sessions feel like and no longer uses her heart rate monitor.

To view the New York Times article, click the link: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/11/judging-badly-how-hard-we-exercise/

Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

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