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Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 2

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Stop when 80% Full: (week 2-4)

This is the second “anchor habit”. To lose fat, clients usually have to eat less than they do now.  “80% full” is not a specific number, but rather an idea: Eat until you are “just satisfied” or “no longer hungry” but not full or stuffed.  This habit continues to teach appetite awareness, building intuitive understanding and control of hunger/fullness. Over time, you will learn to sense your hunger and satiety cues properly, as well as distinguish physical hunger from cravings.  This habit helps you analyze eating habits as a process (rather than something that “just happens”). You can identify situations/cues that contribute to your eating habits and improve mindfulness.  This habit puts the burden of action on you–you have to struggle to figure this out.  This is a “hard” habit: harder to do, but simpler to understand so give yourself time to figure this out. This can be mentally, emotionally, or physically uncomfortable.  At first, you may not be able to feel hunger or fullness or any stomach cues. Try to keep learning, and pay attention to any signs that you are physically hungry or full, such as hunger cues, fullness cues, and satiety cues.  Hunger cues include “hunger headache”; light-headedness or “spaced out”; being “hangry” (hungry + angry); growling or empty-feeling stomach; etc. Over-fullness cues (ate too much) include feeling stuffed/bloated; heartburn; feeling nauseated or gassy; feeling heavy and sluggish; etc.  Satiety cues (ate just enough) include feeling energized and no longer hungry; feeling generally satisfied; feeling as though you could get up from the table and do something (such as go for a walk); etc.

You may need to learn what “100% full” or even “120% full” is first, before you can get to “80%”.  Once you learn your cues, you can learn to stop short of “stuffed” or plan to eat before you get too hungry to make good decisions. Rest assured that although you should start working on this anchor habit now, there is no time frame that you must have it mastered by. Those with chronic stomach upset may find that this habit plus the previous one actually help your condition, possibly to the point where you cut down or get off stomach medications.

Eat Lean Protein at Each Meal: (Week 4-6)

We need protein for almost every metabolic process in the body. Making sure to get enough protein will help preserve lean mass (i.e. bone and muscle), as well as help you feel fuller longer.  This is an “easy” habit that is easy to understand and generally well accepted as do-able by most individuals.  This habit clicks with most people, as it finally feels like you are getting a nutritional strategy by being told what to eat. This habit adds food instead of taking it away, which helps people feel less “deprived”.

One of the biggest aspects of this habit is learning and understanding what foods are actually high in protein (it’s not almond milk, nuts, or bacon).  Having a shopping list before going to the store with protein rich foods you enjoy is a must when doing your grocery trip.  At first, it doesn’t really matter what specific foods you choose as long as you get into the habit of adding protein to meals.  This habit is most challenging for vegetarian and especially vegans.  In these cases, more thought and planning will be needed to set up meals.  Buying, preparing, and having high protein foods easily available will greatly improve your success with this habit.  Try to create a menu for your week so you know and understand how you will incorporate protein dense foods at each meal.  Understand what a serving of protein looks like (1-1.5 palms for women, 1-2 palms for men).  Servings size may need to be adjusted based on meal frequency, goals, and food tolerance.

Seven Habits for Long Term Success–Part 1

There are hundreds, if not thousands of diets that have been used throughout history. The intent of most diets is to lose weight and bodyfat. Diets that “work” will reduce your intake of calories. This can be done by reducing or eliminating certain food groups, types of food, or macronutrients. If the diet reduces caloric intake enough, then an individual will lose weight and body fat. A good diet will encourage the intake of vegetables, fruits, healthy fats, and lean proteins, but these aren’t mandatory for weight loss and fat loss. The problem with dieting alone is that good nutritional skills and habits are not typically emphasized so they do not last. Once the “diet” ends, then we revert back to old broken habits and lose all of our progress.

At Fenton Fitness, we utilize the Precisions Nutrition system of habit-based nutrition coaching. We know that in order to change, our actions need to change. And in order to make lasting changes, actions need to remain changed. This is where a habit-based approach comes in. Most people know how to eat better or what they can do to lose weight. What they lack are the skills and action steps to make that a reality. With our Nutrition Coaching clients, we have a 52-week curriculum that helps clients work through obstacles and motivations. We introduce new habits every two weeks along with daily lessons that reinforce and teach the importance of each habit. Each habit builds off of the previous one, mastering one before moving on. For most people, two weeks is a good time frame to get a good grip on each habit, but If there is difficulty, we simply spend more time on that habit until the client is ready to move on.

The six habits which back up the foundation of our program will take most of our clients twelve weeks to work through. These six habits will serve anyone looking to improve their eating habits and can be adapted to virtually any food preference and goal. This series will describe the basics of our program.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

Take Time:
I hear it over and over from our clients: “I’m busy, I don’t have time to eat right.” I get it. You’re busy, we’re busy too. When you’re busy, you need to have a plan to get the important stuff done because getting into shape won’t happen by accident. Remember, nobody is going to “give” you time. You have to take that time. Create time, carve it out, grab it, defend it like a mad man once you’ve got it. Because that time is an appointment with YOU.

Here’s what a many people find about setting that time aside. Making time puts YOU in control.
Whatever your reasons for being busy (and rushed), I’m sure they’re good ones (except maybe that netflix or social media binge time). And whatever your reason, today is the day you start a new relationship with “busy”. Today, by making time, you start to take control back. Control of your life, and your time. The kind of control that will eventually make you feel more focused, more confident, more in charge, and ultimately… happier.

You need time to change your body. One more reason to make time: getting healthier, fitter, and in better shape is a slow process. You’ve got to put in the work, be patient, and persistent. But remember: If you want to change your body, being consistent is more important than anything else. So get in the habit of making that time, consistently, starting today.

Slow Down: (week 1-2)
It’s so simple, you won’t believe it, but it works. At every meal today, eat more slowly than you normally do. Today, and for the next two weeks, focus on doing this habit. Keep doing your first habit (making time). In the PN Coaching system, habits are cumulative–they build on each other, one by one. So a new habit doesn’t mean ditch the old one. A new habit means you simply add one more tool to your tool belt. In other words, keep doing your first habit: making time.

How to eat slowly: At each meal today, take a few extra minutes to simply pause (Here’s where your “make time” habit comes in handy.). Put your utensils down between each bite. Take a breath. When you take a bite, notice, and enjoy the taste and texture of the food.
Then put down those utensils again, and take another breath, or a sip of water. Relax, wait a few more moments before picking up your utensils again and repeat. That’s it. Quick tip: Try a timer.

If you’d like to track your progress with this habit, try simply timing yourself today.
Check your watch before you start eating. Or start a timer. When you’re done eating, see how long you took. Now you have a baseline for improvement! If you add only one minute per day, by the end of two weeks you’ll have added nearly 15 minutes more. Smooth ‘n’ easy.

Help yourself succeed. Eating slowly is one of the most important habits of the PN system. But in a rushing-around and busy society, it’s hard to remember at first. Changing a habit will take a little extra effort in the beginning, and that’s OK. That’s why we recommend at least two weeks on this habit. Here’s how to stay on track:
1. Make a note of your goal to eat slowly on a Post-it note, your computer, or your phone.
2. Put it somewhere that you’ll see it often, especially before you eat.
3. If you’ve used your computer or phone, set a reminder to go off before your regular meal times.
4. During your meal, try using a timer to check how fast you’re eating.
5. You can also use an app. Here is one we like: EatSlowly (for iphone)
6. Having a bit more information about what you’re actually doing can help you track your improvement with this habit over the next couple of weeks.
7. Even if you add only one minute per meal, that counts as progress!

Three Steps To Reaching Your Goals

Roughly 20% of the U.S. population has a gym membership.  Based on my 20 years of experience in the fitness industry, I would estimate that of that 20%, only one half to three quarters actually regularly and consistently use that membership. I find that the majority of people who struggle with consistency do so because they either lack focus and goals or because they fail to reach those goals.  At Fenton Fitness & Athletic Center, we have found there to be three key components to reaching any goal in the fitness and nutrition realm.

Setting the Goal

First and foremost, we must name our goal.  I suggest writing this goal down and possibly sharing this goal with somebody you trust and who supports you.  When choosing your goal, you want it to be specific, something that can be measured, something realistic/attainable, and you want to give yourself a time frame to accomplish the goal.  Think about why you want to reach that goal.  It can be helpful to place the written goal somewhere visible that you will see on a regular basis.  If we can’t make a given goal happen, we can alter our actions to bring us closer to that goal.

Behaviors/Skills

Once our goal is set, we want to write out the behaviors and skills needed to reach that goal.  For example, if your goal is to drop 20lbs, two key behaviors would be eating less calories and being more active.  In the case of somebody who wants to be able to Bench Press their body weight, their skills might be bench pressing progressively heavier weights 2-3 times each week and eating sufficient protein.

Habits/Practices

After setting our behaviors that are needed to achieve our goal, we must then set up our daily habits or practices that will lead to successful execution of our behaviors, which in turn will lead to achieving our goals.  Our habits for our sample goals might look like this:

            20 pounds weight loss (less calories, more activity)

            -Pack gym bag before going to bed and put in car, including a protein shake in bag

-Go to bed 7-8 hours before alarm is going to go off

-Wake up 15 minutes earlier to eat breakfast at home instead of fast food

-Workout at lunch hour instead of going out to eat with coworkers, drink shake instead of eating lunch.

            Bench Press Body weight (2-3 progressively heavier bench press workouts and more protein)

            -Go to bed 7-8 hours before alarm is going to go off

-Set alarm 1 hour early Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for early morning workout

-Prepare/plan breakfast the before going to bed and pack lunch for next day targeting 0.15-0.25g of protein/pound of body weight.

-Buy quality protein shake, protein bars, and/or Jerky to help supplement protein needs at snacks.  Keep them at home, in the car, and at work.

 

From start to finish it can be helpful to set up a chart that looks something like this.

It should be noted that it is best to only introduce one major goal at a time into your life.  I recommend picking just one goal and working on that for 3-12 months before adding or changing goals.

Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CSFC, Pn1

 

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