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Will That Machine Help Me?

Home Gym Hints

Television ads, holiday gift giving, and the return of frigid temperatures brings out the “What cardio machine should I purchase for my home?” question.  Is it the bike with an internet trainer, the fat blasting high intensity elliptical trainer, or the Euro designed Nordic ski machine?  Many of these units sell for over $3000 and they wish to choose wisely.  Most of the questioners have no experience with any of these gizmos.  I have some pre-purchase questions they need to answer before buying that expensive cardio machine.

Can you currently walk for thirty minutes without stopping to rest?

If you answer no to that question, do not bother purchasing a treadmill, bike, or elliptical unit.  Focus all of your efforts on developing the strength and skill necessary to walk for thirty minutes without resting.  If pain is a limitation, get to the physical therapy clinic and resolve the problem.  Walking is the essential neuromuscular activity that keeps a body healthy and out of the assisted living center.  Leaning over on a treadmill, elliptical trainer, or recumbent bike is very likely to worsen those walking woes.

Do you have a prior history of consistent exercise?

Just owning a new high-tech training machine will not make you thinner or fitter.  You must use the machine three or four days a week for the next year.  Many people believe that locating the machine in the dwelling will jump-start the exercise habit.  If you answer no to this question, I have concerns that you will not develop a relationship with your internet connected mechanical friend.

Is fat loss the primary reason you are purchasing the home exercise machine?

The fat loss the exercise motto everyone needs to learn is; “familiarity breeds failure”.   The human body is a master at adapting to a physical stress and the forty-five minute spin class that burns 440 calories in February only consumes 180 calories in August.  The sad truth is that the same amount of exercise time and effort produces a weaker fat loss response.   The crucial components for fat loss are long duration meal preparation and high intensity portion awareness.  After you get those under control, progress to activities that you find challenging (difficult, not good at, loath, hate) and change the training modality on a frequent basis.  Using the same exercise device month after month will not produce optimal results.

Michael O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

The Wisdom of Frank

I met my friend Frank when I was 21 years old and working out at a local gym.  Frank was sixty-eight years old and in great condition.  He had been a professional boxer, army fitness instructor, and then a physical education teacher.  Frank was an incredibly well read student of fitness and human performance.  He was stronger, more agile, and fitter than most people in their twenties.  Success leaves footprints, so I was eager to learn from a master.

Frank’s biggest lesson was that no matter how busy, over worked, and over scheduled you were, there was no excuse not to perform some type of exercise.  The crucial component of lifelong fitness is consistency.  You can slow down but never stop.  Do something, even if it is only ten minutes–every day.  As Frank traveled through his eighties, he performed twenty minute sessions of mobility work and some calisthenics on a daily basis.

A recent *article by Gretchen Reynolds in the New York Times reinforces this lesson.  Older athletes that maintain the lifelong fitness habit have remarkable fitness assessment scores.  Many have posted VO2 max tests that make researchers rethink the present expectations for testing standards.

*Age Like a Former Athlete, Gretchen Reynolds, New York Times, August 23, 2107.

View the NY Times Article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/23/well/move/age-like-a-former-athlete.html?_r=0

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

 

Fitness Success Secrets

WSJ and My Fitness Success Suggestions

A member at the gym brought in this *article from the May 20, 2017 issue of the Wall Street Journal.  The article had some good tips on exercise compliance but fell short in other areas.  Take the time to read my suggestions.  These habits have been time tested, proven winners in multiple studies on real world people who were successful in making fitness a lifelong habit.

Get Some Help.

Numerous studies have shown that individuals that seek the assistance of a personal trainer or fitness coach are more successful in long term exercises compliance.  The guidance from a fitness expert improves motivation, goal attainment and is more time efficient.  Scientific understanding of fitness and the best training practices have changed dramatically in the last fifteen years, and your knowledge is probably behind the times.  A good coach will temper your “beginner’s enthusiasm” and make it less likely you will over train and/or injure yourself.  A professional helps you reach goals despite physical limitations or prior fitness challenges.

Personal Performance Evaluations.

In school, you have tests to see if you are gaining knowledge and ready to advance in a specific subject.  The same should be true of your training program.  The minimal requirement is a Functional Movement Screen.  This simple test can prevent 90% of the fitness related injuries we see in the physical therapy clinic.  Keep a record of relevant performance evaluations—a good trainer can help you with this.  Your initial successes with exercise will come in the form of better strength, mobility, and work capacity.  An ongoing record of “fitness victories” strongly reinforces the exercise habit.

Have Reasonable Goals.

The infomercials for fitness products promise big changes in extremely short periods of time.  Television shows document massive fat loss in a single month.   The healthiest changes in body composition occur slowly and steadily.  Make those body composition goals, but also make performance goals such as being able to perform a pullup, twenty lunges, or a full pain free squat.  I can think of no better goals than being able to eliminate blood pressure medication, normalize blood sugar levels, or decrease the use of anti-inflammatory medications.

Place Your Exercise Session At the Beginning Of the Day. 

The University of Michigan department of psychology found that individuals that are successful with long-term exercise compliance train in the morning before other aspects of life have a chance to interfere.  Consistency is King–an exercise plan will never work if you are not able to maintain a schedule.  The most consistent attendance happens when gym members train in the mornings.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

*Wall Street Journal, May 20, 2017, Rachel Bachman, Five Secrets for Steadier Workouts

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#10–Establish A Veggie And Protein Habit

One of the biggest deficits I see in many food logs is the lack of protein consumed.  We have been conditioned to snack on high carb/highly processed food, so eating more protein can be a difficult shift.  When I do see protein, it’s in the higher fat varieties of sausage, bacon, burgers, etc.  It would benefit younger individuals to start adding healthy doses of protein to their diets as soon as they are responsible for their own food preparation.  Shoot to have some form of lean protein as the base of your meal along with a couple of servings of vegetables. Once you have that base (taking up ½ to ⅔ of your plate), then you can add in whole grains, starchy carbs, fruits, dairy, healthy fats, etc.  Protein increases your metabolic rate more than any other nutrient, aids in recovery, helps build and maintain muscle mass, and much more.  We recommend 25-35% of total calories to come from protein, or 0.8-1gram/pound of body weight.  Most individuals should shoot for 4-8 servings of vegetables per day as well.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

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