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Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Plyo Push Ups

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Plyo Push Ups.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/C0A0dibCmqE

Plyo Push Ups are a great horizontal power exercise for the upper body that simultaneously improves core stability. Pushing has obvious carryover for most sports and tends to be more on the speed side of the power spectrum. It can be easily progressed by adding a weight vest (use caution while performing this exercise due to force on the wrists).

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Split Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Split Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. See video here: https://youtu.be/yahWPNE0C-k

Those who have worked up to Split Jumps know it is a tremendous power exercise.  It challenges balance and puts the individual in a split stance which has much more carryover to running and cutting on the athletic field.  Split Jumps can be increased in difficulty by adding load (DBs or KBs in the hands or a weight vest) or by elevating the back foot.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Muscle Preservation and Fat Loss

NY Times on Fat Loss

One of the adverse effects of diets is the loss of muscle that accompanies a reduction of body fat.  Muscle is the metabolic engine, injury preventative armor, and longevity enhancing elixir of human biology.  Gretchen Reynolds of the New York Times has written an enlightening *article on the best method of losing body fat while holding onto valuable muscle.  The recent research reveals that a program of strength training produces optimal fat loss with significantly less muscle wasting.  Long slow distance exercise combined with caloric restriction accelerates muscle loss.  Your choice of exercise activity can have a profound impact on your physical performance and health.  Read the NY Times article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/15/well/move/to-maintain-muscle-and-lose-fat-as-you-age-add-weights.html?_r=0.

After the age of 25, the average American gains a pound of fat and loses a ½ pound of muscle every year.  If no action in taken to reverse this trend, the average American will have gained 25-30 pounds of fat and shed 12-15 pounds of muscle by the time they reach 55 years of age.  This 55 year old will stand on the scale 12 to 18 pounds heavier, but the true alteration in body composition is far more dramatic.

America does not have “an obesity epidemic”, it has a “muscle atrophy epidemic”.  We are not so much over fat as we are under muscled.  The simplistic notion of “losing weight” fails to improve health because it accelerates muscle loss.  Middle age muscle loss is the catalyst for many of the illnesses that plague us later in life.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

*To Maintain Muscle and Lose Fat as Your Age, Add Weights, Gretchen Reynolds, New York Times, November 15, 2017

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Broad Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Broad Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/iAmz2kyOx-0.

Broad jumps are a great movement for developing horizontal power/force production. Traditional Olympic Lifts emphasize vertical force with little carryover to sprinting/jumping.  Broad jumps emphasize speed though loading them can be difficult.  However, if you wish to progress the exercise and you have good mechanics, add a weight vest with a load of 10-20% of your body weight.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Box Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Box Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/LV9DH157nrU.

Although named box jumps, this exercise should technically be called box landings.  The point of a box jump is to introduce jumping and landing mechanics without the impact and force absorption of the landing that can lead to injury in many individuals.  The goal here should be to jump and land, softly, in the same position.  Once mastered, a one leg hop progression can be added.  Lastly, a traditional jump or hop can be used since your body will be ready to properly absorb the force of the movement.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Rotational Throws

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Rotational Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/HrbowSvJ9Ck.

This movement is one area where Med Balls trump traditional weightlifting movements.  While the Clean & Jerk and Snatch are very linear and bilateral (2 feet on the ground), the Med Ball Rotational Throw works on an often neglected rotational power component.  This is a must for golfers, and softball or baseball players.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Stepping Overhead Throw

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Stepping Overhead Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/bQgwLhw_HAM.

Much like the Med Ball chest pass, the Med Ball stepping overhead throw can be regressed to be much more stable for beginners or progressed to be much more dynamic and athletic in nature. This is a fantastic tool for any throwing athlete.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Posterior Medicine Ball Throws

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Posterior Medicine Ball Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View video here: https://youtu.be/V4Q8tCznpQM

If you haven’t quite mastered a good hip hinge pattern that allows you to swing a kettlebell or if you want to focus more on speed, try this move.  The posterior Med Ball throw is a lower body dominant movement that emphasizes hip extension.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Wall Balls

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Wall Balls.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. You can view the video here: https://youtu.be/vCWu2gsCfU4.

If you are looking for a full body movement that offers the same triple extension (ankle, knee, hip) as the traditional weightlifting movements, then this exercise is for you.  Wall Balls focus on vertical power development.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Chest Pass

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Chest Pass.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/iN4qcOPe2vo

The Med Ball chest pass is a great exercise to build up horizontal pushing power.  It can be regressed to be stable, safe, and emphasize the upper body musculature, or progressed to be very dynamic and athletic in nature.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

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