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Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#10–Establish A Veggie And Protein Habit

One of the biggest deficits I see in many food logs is the lack of protein consumed.  We have been conditioned to snack on high carb/highly processed food, so eating more protein can be a difficult shift.  When I do see protein, it’s in the higher fat varieties of sausage, bacon, burgers, etc.  It would benefit younger individuals to start adding healthy doses of protein to their diets as soon as they are responsible for their own food preparation.  Shoot to have some form of lean protein as the base of your meal along with a couple of servings of vegetables. Once you have that base (taking up ½ to ⅔ of your plate), then you can add in whole grains, starchy carbs, fruits, dairy, healthy fats, etc.  Protein increases your metabolic rate more than any other nutrient, aids in recovery, helps build and maintain muscle mass, and much more.  We recommend 25-35% of total calories to come from protein, or 0.8-1gram/pound of body weight.  Most individuals should shoot for 4-8 servings of vegetables per day as well.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#9–Build Muscle

Much like strength, muscle mass is often not prioritized until it is largely too late.  Though you can still build muscle at an older age, it is much more difficult.  Muscle mass is highly correlated with strength which is correlated with power.  All of these tend to decline substantially at around age 30.  If you take advantage of your hormonal environment and your recovery abilities in your 20’s, you can stockpile a good amount of muscle for the rest of your life so that you can keep doing everything you want as you age.  More muscle also means a better and healthier metabolism which means less accumulation of unwanted body fat and overall better health. The best way to build muscle mass is through resistance training with gradual increases to volume (weight x reps x sets) over time along with a moderate to high protein intake.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Advice From The Experts At Fenton Fitness

Tara Parker-Pope wrote a great article in the October 17, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled “The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s.”  While I agree with some of these recommendations, we at Fenton Fitness and Fenton Physical Therapy have some suggestions of our own.

#8—Eliminate Liquid Calories

One of the easiest ways to improve nutrition is to eliminate liquid calories from the diet.  Liquid calories for young people can come in many forms including coffee drinks, alcohol, pop, smoothies, juice, energy drinks, etc.  Most of these items offer very little nutritional benefit, are highly correlated with increased body fat, and don’t cause the same amount of satiety (feeling of fullness) of their calorie matched food equivalents.  Over the last decade working with individuals on their nutrition, I have seen magical transformations simply by eliminating calories you can drink.  Rather than wait for the body fat to pile on and your insulin sensitivity to be shot, avoid this pitfall early in life.  Opt instead for more water, plain tea, or diet soda if you can’t resist something sweet and fizzy.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

To read the article, click on the link below:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/16/well/live/health-tips-for-your-20s.html?_r=0

 

 

Retirement Planning Basics

Fitness Is Number One–The Rest Is Just Numbers

008Wall Street Journal reporter Glenn Ruffenach’s recent piece on retirement planning really hit home.  In my many years working as a physical therapist, I have determined that the most important aspect of retirement planning is the maintenance or improvement of mobility, strength, and endurance as you get older.  I have treated hundreds of people that have done a great job of preparing themselves financially, but their fitness is so impaired that they are unable to enjoy any aspect of their retirement years.  Physical limitations prevent them from traveling and being active with family and friends.  Their retirement savings are devoured by the cost of life long medications, doctor bills, and medical tests.  Sadly, many of them do not live long enough to enjoy spending the savings they amassed with a lifetime of labor.

Please take the time to read, *The Biggest Mistake People Make Nearing Retirement.  It is never to late to start planning for your fitness future. View the article here: http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-biggest-mistake-people-make-nearing-retirement-1477274941

*Wall Street Journal, Glenn Ruffenach, October 25, 2016, The Biggest Mistake People Make Nearing Retirement.

_Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS_

Fitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated.  Physical performance and recovery capacity are dramatically different.  If you need proof, look for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL.  The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime.  I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client. 

Filling the Empty Nest

Rushing from work to pick the kids up from school, making a quick snack while they change for their various practices, back in the car to drop off or pick up, I finally arrive at the gym for a 60-minute Team Training class.  Adrenaline up and a check list on my mind, I hear that voice in my head that echoes “You’re going to miss it when it’s gone.”

shutterstock_184855727At 46, with four kids between 10 and 17, I’m at the peak of my parental responsibility, but I have several friends who have “been there and done that” and who now sit in empty nests missing the chaos that gave them purpose.  As an outsider looking in to what seems like a magical phase of peace and quiet and time to make a proper dinner, I know it’s a difficult transition.  There is a void to be filled when the kids leave for college and, if you look around the gym, you’ll see that many in this demographic turn to fitness.

Now it’s your turn. You’re done with home videos and bored with treadmill monotony.  You have time, you have focus, and you just realized that a decade of eating dinner at concession stands was not in your best interest.  Moreover, you have nagging pain in your lower back or shoulder that you’ve ignored for years.  Fenton Fitness offers experienced trainers to help you get started on a plan for you.  Seeking expert guidance, scheduling training sessions, attending motivating classes, and becoming more mindful of your nutrition are healthy and productive ways to aid in your transition.

With more energy, better sleep, and a trimmer, stronger body, you’ll have all the tools you need to entertain your kids when they come home.

-Amy Warner, Director of Sales and Marketing

Fitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated.  Physical performance and recovery capacity are dramatically different.  If you need proof, look for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL.  The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime.  I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client.  

Carry, Squat, Lunge, Hinge, Pull, Push– Every Week

005Most strength coaches divide human movement into 5-6 fundamental movement patterns.  These movements are what we are talking about when we call our training “functional.” Personally, I like to go with 6 patterns in the following order of importance: Carry, Squat, Lunge, Hinge, Pull, and Push.  These functional patterns include virtually all aspects of human movement.

The first two, carry and squat, are performed daily in real life while the other movement patterns are used less frequently.  Incorporating these movement patterns into your training program at least once per week will ensure that you develop a well-rounded physique, but more importantly, that your musculoskeletal system functions like the awesome machine it was made to be. Practicing these movement patterns should keep you free from asymmetry and injuries.  You will also become stronger and well balanced giving you the confidence to take on whatever life throws at you.  Just how frequently you train each pattern will depend on your current training status, movement quality, experience, and goals.  Following is a loose guide:
Carry: 3-5x/wk  (this can include traditional carries, crawls, Turkish Get Ups, or sleds)
Squat: 2-3x/wk
Lunge: 2-4x/wk
Hinge: 1-2x/wk, (Deadlifts, KB swings, or Good Mornings all fall into this category)
Pull: 3-5x/wk
Push: 2-4x/wk

-Jeff Tirrell, B.S., CSCS, Pn1

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