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desk

PDFStanding desks are great for posture and health, but many people have difficulty when they first start using them.  In this issue, Mike O’Hara, PT gives exercises that can help you stand for longer periods of time.  Watch the video for instruction on these exercises.  In his article, “The Biomechanics We All Need To Know, Mike agrees with the advice given by Stuart McGill.  Be sure to read about Fenton Fitness Member Jan Pilar and her success with her program.

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standing-desk-pro-plus-36_main-1I have known Tracy for at least seven years.  She is an active mother of three children and works full time as an accountant.  Over a four-year span, Tracy was a patient in our physical therapy clinic three times for the same problem of leg and lower back pain.  Tracy always recovered and was able to return to work but her last bout of pain lasted three months.  I ran into Tracy at a restaurant recently.  She stated that she was ashamed to admit it, but after four years of listening to me preach about the benefits of a standing work station, she finally got out of the chair and started working at a stand up desk.  This is her standing desk story.

Her legs “felt tired” for the initial eight weeks and she went back and forth between standing and an office chair.  Tracy kept performing her hip mobility exercises and lumbar stability drills and gradually became more accustom to her new workstation.  She has been using the standing desk for three years, and in that time, she has not been bothered by any back or leg pain.  An additional benefit has been an eight-pound weight loss and “surprisingly” her “sinus headaches” have resolved.  Tracy told me she sits for at most three hours of a workday and could not imagine going back to a seated workstation. Tracy stated that three of her coworkers have made the standing desk transition and all report similar results.

Prolonged sitting creates multiple postural pain problems.  Postural Stress Disorder (PSD) is the new term given to the pain created by seated office work.  In our physical therapy clinics, we are seeing more and more patients with face, head, neck, shoulder, back, and hip pain associated with prolonged sitting.

We are de-evolving into a nation of sitters.  Between internet, television, driving, and computer work, it is not uncommon for many of my physical therapy patients and fitness clients to sit for ten hours a day.  Unfortunately, you cannot train away the bad effects of prolonged sitting with a 45 minute session of exercise.

While it takes some effort, and a little office remodeling, the benefits of using a standing workstation cannot be ignored.  I was happy to hear Tracy’s story and recognize her as one of my reluctant, but now pain-free converts.  If you have an occupation that places you in front of a computer, you should invest in a stand up style workstation that allows you to be upright for most of the day.  Many large corporations have recognized the benefit and have made the switch to standing workstations.  Standing desks are now more affordable and several of my converts have one at work and one at home.
-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

I have been a standing desk evangelist for the last six years.I have converted hundreds of seated apostates to the virtues of the standing workstation. Physical therapy patients and fitness cliestanding_desknts testify to the resolution of pain, restoration of function and a new belief in all things movement. Indeed my time on this earth will have been well spent if I can just get more people standing during their workday.

If you have a boss that controls expenditures for office equipment, he or she should read Daniel Akst June 2, 2016 article in the Wall Street Journal, “Want To Get More Done at the Office? Just Stand Up.” The author discusses recent research from Texas A & M on the use of standing desks in the work place. The big take away is that the subjects in this fairly large and long-term study were 46% more productive than their seated workmates.

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