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PDFIn this issue, Mike O’Hara, PT gives ten reasons to love lunges.  Video of lunge exercises/progressions are included.  In Going Grizzly, Mike presents the exercise combination of Crawls and Sandbag Carries; a combination that helps you train more efficiently and move better.  Watch the video for instruction on these exercises.

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Kettlebell Swings and Push Ups

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.   

Swings and Push Ups

Strength coach Dan John got me started on kettlebell swings/push up sessions.   This pairing challenges core stability as the swings create an anti-flexion core stabilization demand and the push ups an anti-extension demand.  If your goal is fat loss, this exercise pairing produces a total body metabolic boost.  A hidden benefit is getting up and down off the floor during the training session.  It is a basic mobility skill we need to practice in order to maintain our independence.

Kettlebell Swings
kb_swingA swing is not a squat and a squat is not a swing.  A kettlebell swing is a hip dominant motion; the hips move a lot and the knees just a little.  The handle of the kettlebell should stay above the knees.  At the bottom of the swing, the forearms should contact the upper thighs.  You swing the kettlebell forward with an explosive contraction of the gluteal and hamstring muscles.  Do not lift the kettlebell with the arms.  Project, or throw, the kettlebell to shoulder level and no higher.  The swing is an exercise that is worthy of some coaching.  Find an instructor that can help you with proper performance.

Push Ups
Keep the shoulder blades down the back and tight against the rib cage.  Hold the head in a retracted position and relax the neck.  The shoulders should not ride up into a shrugged position. Start at the bottom of the push up (flat on the floor).  Place the hands under the shoulders and keep the elbows tucked in to the side of the body.  Grip the floor with the hands and activate the muscles in the back of the shoulder blades.  Brace the abdominal muscles, tighten the glutes, and maintain tension between the legs by drawing them together.  Push up while maintaining spinal and shoulder position.   Hold at the top for two counts and repeat the push up.

Swing/Push Up Sessions
The great thing about these sessions is that you need minimal equipment—just a single kettlebell and a willingness to work hard.

This is a good place to start.  You will need a kettlebell and a stopwatch.
Swings x 20 seconds
Push ups x 6 repetitions
Rest 30 seconds
Repeat for fifteen minutes
As you get stronger, increase the push up repetitions.

This is one of my favorite swing/push up training sessions.
20 swings
20 push ups
20 swings
15 push ups
20 swings
10 push ups
20 swings
5 push ups
20 swings
You will finish with 100 swings and 50 push ups.

Try a push up “countdown” session.  Follow this pattern:
10 swings
10 push ups
10 swings
9 push ups
10 swings
8 push ups
Work your way down to 7-6-5-4-3-2-1 push up.  You will complete 100 swings and 55 push ups and transfer up and down off the floor 10 times.  If that is too much, modify the program and start at five push ups.  You will complete 50 swings and 15 push ups.

View video of Mike performing these exercises here: https://youtu.be/Vq3VYg847Xs

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Turkish Get Ups and Waiters Walks

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.   

Turkish Get Up and Waiter Walk Complex

How you move says more about your fitness than how you look.  The pairing of the Turkish Get Up (TGU) and Waiter Walk is an exercise complex that improves gait mechanics and the survival skill of getting up and down off the ground.  You will be performing a TGU and immediately move into a Waiter Walk so you need twenty yards of open space.  As you get stronger at this complex and use a heavier implement, some interesting things start to happen.  You get better at controlling respiration and have an intense focus on how your body moves during the TGU and Waiter Walk.  My yoga friends tell me this is the focus of their practice sessions: better respiration, improved motor control, and increased strength.

Turkish Get Up

t_get_upsThe Turkish Get Up (TGU) is generally performed with a kettlebell, but you can use a dumbbell.  A medicine ball can help teach body alignment to beginners.

Exercise activities that produce the greatest rewards are the ones that take the most time to master.  You can learn a barbell curl in five seconds but a TGU can take weeks to master.  Developing proficiency with the Turkish Get Up will require some patience and instruction, but for the time spent, the pay off is tremendous.  Complete instruction on the TGU is not possible in this short article.  Watch the accompanying video and work with a qualified trainer on this exercise.  Steve Cotter and Gray Cook both have excellent YouTube tutorials on the TGU.

Waiter Walk

You must have adequate shoulder range of motion and good balance to perform this exercise safely.  Hold the kettlebell overhead like a waiter carrying a tray.  Keep the chest proud and the neck relaxed.  The upper arm should be adjacent to the head and your walk should be smooth and free of any lean or limp.

Complex
I like to train TGU rookies with a soft Dynamax ball.  If they drop the ball it will not damage any aspect of their anatomy.  Balancing the ball on the hand tends to teach proper alignment.  Progress to a kettlebell as you become more proficient.  Start on the floor and perform the TGU ascent.  Once at the top of the TGU, perform a Waiter Walk for twenty yards and then lower back down to the floor with a TGU descent.  Switch the implement to the other side and repeat.  Perform two trips on each side.

When you perform this complex, strive to move more gracefully before adding more resistance.   Get up and down off the floor and walk in a coordinated and efficient manner.  Only then increase the load of the ‘bell.

View video of Mike performing these exercises herehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0U9GWMI4bU&t=8s

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Renegade Rows and SHELC

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.  

Renegade Row-SHELC Combo

Renegade Rows
The renegade row starts in the top position of a push up.  Rubber hex dumbbells work the best for this exercise since they do not move on the floor.  Place the dumbbells on the floor and position the hands on top of the dumbbells.  Try to align the dumbbells directly under the armpits.  Maintain a strong grip on the dumbbell handle during the exercise.  Spread the feet at least shoulder width.  Tighten the shoulder blades down the back and create total body tension.   Without allowing the torso to turn, row one dumbbell up so the thumb approaches the armpit.  Lower the dumbbell in a controlled manner and repeat with the other arm.  Perform five repetitions on each arm.

Supine Hip Extension Leg Curls
shelcSet the TRX straps so the bottom of the strap is at the mid-calf level of your leg.  Lay supine and place the heels in the foot straps of the TRX.  The feet should be directly under the overhead attachment point of the TRX.  Place the arms on the floor at a 45 degree angle.  Brace the abdominal muscles and keep the head down.  Push the arms against the floor for stability.  Lift the hips off the floor and keep them up for the duration of the set.  Bend the knees so that the feet travel toward the body.  Keep the hips up and extend the knees in a controlled manner.  Perform ten to fifteen repetitions.  Common mistakes are turning the feet outward and allowing the hips to fall toward the floor as the knees flex and extend.

The anti-flexion and anti-rotation core stabilization demand created by this pair of exercises produces some interesting next day abdominal muscle soreness.  The ability to link the hips to the shoulder and produce movement is what everyone tries to accomplish with functional training.  Move through three sets of the Renegade Row – SHELC combo and let me know how it goes.

View video of Mike performing these exercises here: https://youtu.be/2_fT0zShTSo

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Hip Lifts and Roll Outs

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.  

Hip Lifts and Roll Outs

An intricate system of muscles holds the spine upright over the top of the pelvis.  This pair of exercises coordinates and strengthens this support system.  If you sit all day long, have postural problems, or a history of lower back pain this pair of exercises is worthy of your training time.

Hip Lifts
hip_liftThis drill coordinates hip extension and lumbar spine stability.  It is very beneficial when progressed to the single leg version.  Lay with your shoulders across a bench with the head supported.  Place your arms out to the sides.  Plant the feet on the ground with the knees bent 90 degrees and the shins perpendicular to the floor.  Drop the hips to the floor and then push back up with the gluteals and hamstring muscles.  Hold at the top for two counts and repeat.

Roll Outs
The roll out can be scaled to serve any fitness level.  Beginners can start with a large 65 centimeter physioball, and as they become more proficient, progress to a smaller 55 centimeter ball.  The closer the hands get to the floor the more challenging the exercise becomes.  If you get strong enough, you can perform the forward roll out with a Power Wheel or Sorinex roller.

Kneel on a mat to keep the pressure off your knees.  Your femur (thigh bone) is positioned perpendicular to the floor and the hips are hinged at 45 degrees.  Place the hands on the front of the ball and the elbows directly under the chin.  Brace the abdominal muscles and roll out onto the ball until you feel a challenge through your midsection.  Hold in the challenging position for three counts and then return to the starting position.
Perform twelve repetitions of the hip lifts, rest 30 seconds, and then perform ten roll outs.  Rest and repeat the cycle.  Work up to three sets through this exercise combination.

View video of Mike performing these exercises here: https://youtu.be/Xf08rFU7A4w.

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Crawl and Bearhug Sandbag Carry

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:
Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time.  
Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations.  
Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition.  
Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.   

Crawl and Bearhug Sandbag Carry

A finisher is a short but intense, high metabolic cost, training event performed at the end of an exercise session.  The best finishers create carry over to real life activities and can be made more challenging as you become more fit.  When linked to proper diet, finishers produce the “metabolic hit” that stimulates fat loss.  As the name implies, you always perform finishers at the end of your workout because, afterwards, you will not want to do anything else.

Crawl
Crawling is all about the spiral, diagonal force connection that happens through the middle of the body.  Crawling is the primal exercise that enabled us to stand and walk.  The “core muscles” neurologically connect the left hip with the right shoulder and the right hip with the left shoulder.  They stabilize the pelvis and spine so you can transfer force from the hips to the shoulders.  Crawling keeps that connection healthy and strong.

Bear Hug Sandbag Carry

sandbagThe bear hug sandbag carry is the cure for the epidemic of device disability syndrome (DDS).  This exercise reverses all of the weakness that is created by endless hours planted in a chair, staring into a screen.  Sandbag carries are functional core stability work.  The abdominal muscles interact with the muscles in the legs and shoulder girdle to hold a stable upright position.  Walking with a sandbag kicks starts your postural reflexes, the neural feedback mechanism that holds us up against gravity.  Do not go too heavy on the sandbag.  You should be able to stay tall and not stagger or lean forward.

The routine is simple:  Crawl for twenty yards—ten yards down and ten yards back.  Try to keep the knees close to the floor and the back flat.  Immediately after finishing the crawl, pick up the sandbag with a bear hug hold- no hands linked- and carry it for twenty yards.  Rest as needed and repeat.  Start out with three circuits and increase to five.  Try to keep the rest periods under thirty seconds.  Once you get up to five circuits, add a weight vest and then a heavier sandbag.  Modify the distance, load, and cycles to suit your needs.  Give the crawl/bear hug carry combo finisher a try and let me know how it goes.

View video of Mike performing sandbag carries here: https://youtu.be/Ygg2vbf-Uoo

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

 

Goblet Squats and Pull Ups

When designing programs for rehabilitation patients and fitness clients, I often pair up exercises.  This practice is commonly called super-setting and it has multiple benefits:

Train efficiently—You get much more work done during your training time. 

Abolish performance deficits—Most physical therapy and fitness clients need to work on glaring right vs. left movement asymmetries, postural restrictions, and stability limitations. 

Lose weight—Fat loss is a primary goal of most fitness clients.  Pairing exercises ramps up exercise intensity and creates the hormonal response that improves body composition. 

Move better—Training neurologically related movement patterns improves motor control.  

Goblet Squats and Pull Ups

The more inefficient you are when performing an exercise activity the greater the metabolic demand.  Inefficient exercise is the key to fat loss.  Most gym goers become efficient in their selected exercise activities and body composition improvement comes to a standstill.  This pair of exercises creates a systemic response that ramps up the metabolism and drives the hormonal response that creates better body composition numbers.

Goblet Squats
toes_to_fingertipsHold a kettlebell by the horns, with the elbows down and the kettlebell held against the sternum.  Keep the chest proud and relax the neck.  Place the feet at shoulder width and initiate the squat by pushing back the hips.  Keep the torso tall and descend to at least a thigh parallel to the floor position.  Let your pelvis fall between the legs. The elbows should drop down between the knees.  As you get stronger, use two kettlebells held in the double rack position.

Pull Ups
If you are unable to perform a pull up with your own bodyweight, use a band for assist or better yet, one of the machines that assists a pull up.  Use a pronated grip (hands facing away) or a neutral grip (hands facing one another).  I like a set of rings as it affords the shoulders more freedom of movement.  Attempt to get your elbows tight to your side at the top of the pull up.

Perform ten goblet squats, then perform six pull ups, rest sixty seconds, and then cycle back through.  Perform four total trips through this pair of exercises and you will have completed 40 goblet squats and 24 pull ups.  There is something about the pull ups that makes my upper back feel more stable and I move through the goblet squats with greater ease.  As your body composition improves, the pull ups get easier.

View video of these exercises here: https://youtu.be/3L13W9VpqXk

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

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