(810) 750-1996 PH
Fenton Fitness (810) 750-0351 PH
Fenton Physical Therapy (810) 750-1996 PH
Linden Physical Therapy (810) 735-0010 PH
Milford Physical Therapy (248) 685-7272 PH

Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

balance

Ladder Matters

Moving well is a combination of balance, coordination, strength, and power.  During everyday tasks, you must be able to plant, pivot, and shift your bodyweight over one leg to change directions or decelerate an impact.  Movement is a skill that we all take for granted until the day that it fails us.  “I can’t believe I can’t do that,” is commonly heard from people in physical therapy.  They are unaware of the level of motor control they have lost to age, injury, and a sedentary lifestyle.  The good news is that with some consistent training, most motor control skills can be restored.  For gym members, an excellent method of enhancing movement skills is the agility ladder.

Agility ladders help you move better.  How you move says more about your age than how you look.  Responsive legs that can react to a disruption in balance keep you durable and injury free.  Consistent agility ladder training develops the neural coordination that allows more graceful movement.

Rotation is the movement pattern that creates the distance in your golf drive, the pop in your punch, and the acceleration in your sprint.  Rotation is the missing movement pattern in most training programs.  Ladder drills improve cross body, shoulder, and hip rotation.

Ladders are the rehab bridge that allows the injured athlete to move from a controlled series of movement patterns to the chaos of competition.  Ladders are one of the best power production and injury prevention activities older clients can perform.

As a conditioning method, I call ladder drills “three-dimensional jump rope”.   Move through a few sixty second intervals of continuous ladder drills and your body heats up, respiration increases, and your metabolism is disrupted.  Ramp that up to 90 seconds and check your heart rate.  See video of agility ladder drills: https://youtu.be/CmLXGLeyGfE

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Movement You Should Master

Step Ups

Modern medicine is keeping us alive longer, so now we need to put some effort into staying lively longer.  Mastering specific movements will improve our quality of life and help us stay independent and injury-free. I have come up with several exercises you can use to make yourself stronger, more durable, and develop a healthier, more functional body.  An exercise that I have found to be very helpful in restoring the capacity to get up and down off the floor is the Step Up.

Step Ups

The ability to go up and down steps will almost always be needed.  Losing this ability is a sure sign that one’s quality of life and independence are quickly fading.  Step Ups can be done in a variety of different directions and loaded a number of ways making them easily progressed or regressed based on goals and fitness level.  Step Ups improve balance and strength in the glutes, quads, and hamstrings.  Depending how you load, they can also challenge the core and shoulders.  The average step in the United States is 7 inches tall.  Strive to work up to a 14 inch box so that no flight of stairs will ever intimidate you.

Here Coach Katie demonstrates two different versions we like to use and the benefits of each along with some progressions.  Watch the video and give it a try: https://youtu.be/iGXtKyGlKMg.

1) Anterior Step up (Progression: Anterior Step Up with Racked Kettlebell hold)

2) Lateral Step Up (Progression: Lateral Step Up with one side loaded)

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

 

Movement You Should Master

Weighted Carries

Modern medicine is keeping us alive longer, so now we need to put some effort into staying lively longer.  Mastering specific movements will improve our quality of life and help us stay independent and injury-free. I have come up with several exercises you can use to make yourself stronger, more durable, and develop a healthier, more functional body.  An exercise that I have found to be efficient and effective is a Weighted Carry.

Weighted Carries

Very few things are more functional than a carry.  You’d be hard pressed to get through daily life without having to carry something at least a few times per week.  While basic, a carry is an efficient and effective full body exercise.  Depending on the carry you choose, the load is virtually limitless.  Performed for time or distance, carries will always improve gait and core stability.  Depending on which version you use, they can also be an effective tool for improving shoulder mobility/stability, grip strength, balance, and overall awesomeness.  Watch the video and give it try: https://youtu.be/PaP4-IlVAOA

Coach Chad demonstrates my top four carry picks:

1) Farmers Walk (gait, core stability, grip strength, upper back, legs)

2) Suitcase Carry (gait, core anti-lateral flexion, grip, upper back, balance)

3) Waiters Carry (gait, core stability, shoulder stability, balance)

4) Double Waiters Carry (gait, core stability, shoulder mobility, shoulder stability, balance)

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, Pn1

 

Are You Ready?

Spring At The Physical Therapy Clinic

The weather is warming up and soon we will leave the heated, insulated, safety of our home gyms and fitness centers.  The spring migration back to tennis, soccer, pickleball, golf, fitness running, ultimate Frisbee, and stadium steps will begin.  My physical therapy question is– Are you ready for these new challenges?  Has your fitness program prepared you to withstand the rigors of these spring endeavors?  This checklist should help you answer the question.

Have you been performing most of your fitness activities in standing?
Nearly every sport and most household chores are performed in a standing position.  During most of my visits to commercial gyms, the majority of the activity I witness is in the supine, seated, or heavily supported positions.  If your goal is to move better and remain free of injury, then 90% of your exercise should be performed in standing.

Do you practice moving in all directions?
Nearly every sport involves moving side to side, forward-backward, and in a rotational pattern.  Basketball, soccer, golf, and tennis all require you to accelerate and decelerate movement in all directions.  Most gym activities are predominantly sagittal plane– forward and backward.  You ride on the elliptical, spin the bike, and run on the treadmill for months, and your spring visit to the tennis court results in a twisted ankle because you are unfamiliar with side to side movement patterns.

Have you been working on better balance?
Balance is a skill that tends to deteriorate with age, injury, and a sedentary lifestyle.  Many commercial exercise machines take all balance demands away.  The elliptical, spin bike, recumbent bike, rower… all are heavily supported.  Proficiency with single leg stance balance prevents injuries and improves performance.  The older and more deconditioned you have become, the more your fitness program should include single leg stance balance training.

Do you perform any explosive exercises?
We get slower before we get weaker, and life is an up-tempo game.  We need to perform exercise that enhances quickness and improves control of deceleration forces.  What you do in the gym is reflected in how well you can move during activities of daily living.  If you continually exercise at slow tempos, you will get better at moving slowly.  If you train explosively, you get better at moving at faster speeds.  The capacity to decelerate a fall requires fast reactions.  Gracefully traveling up the stairs and getting out of the car are only improved with exercise that enhances power production and speed of movement.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

PDFIn this issue, Mike O’Hara, PT gives ten reasons to love lunges.  Video of lunge exercises/progressions are included.  In Going Grizzly, Mike presents the exercise combination of Crawls and Sandbag Carries; a combination that helps you train more efficiently and move better.  Watch the video for instruction on these exercises.

Download Here

PDFThe September 2016 newsletter contains information on preventing ankle sprains.  Mike O’Hara, PT demonstrates exercises to prevent ankle inversion.  Meet Fenton Fitness member Gay Adams and read her story on staying strong during a difficult time, and learn about the suitcase carry–a better alternative to weighted sidebends.

Download Here

balanceFitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated. Physical performance and recovery capacity are dramatically different. If you need proof, look for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL. The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime. I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client.

Improve Your Balance
Balance, just like functional mobility, strength, and muscle mass, starts declining at around age thirty, and unless you do something, it gets worse as you age. The older you get, the more likely you are to have some degree of balance impairment. As the American population ages, injuries from falls have become a bigger concern. The good news is that no other parameter of performance can improve as quickly as balance.

The recommendation from researchers and clinicians at Too Fit to Fracture (osteoporosis.ca) is that we perform some balance training every day. The training takes no more than five minutes, but to achieve the best results it does need to be an everyday event. My suggestion is to integrate balance training into daily chores. Practice standing on one leg while you brush your teeth. Perform three or four twenty second holds on each leg. Stand on one leg when you fold the clothes, iron the shirts, or wash the dishes. Another great reason to use a standing desk is that it gives you the opportunity to practice some single leg balance as you are working.

Balance is a team effort between the sensors in our joints, the inner ear, and our vision. You want to challenge all aspects of the sensory system during your training. When you go to the gym make sure you exercise in a standing position and always include single leg biased balance activities during your workout. Exercises such as step ups, lunges, and medicine ball drills will all help improve your balance.

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

WORKOUTFitness training for those of us past 40 years of age is more complicated. Physical performance and recovery capacity are dramatically different. If you need proof, look for the forty year olds in the NBA or NFL. The good news is that with proper planning, consistent performance, and the wisdom that comes with age, we can stay fit and active for a lifetime. I have compiled a collection of tips for the forty plus fitness client.

Punch the Clock
I am a big fan of what strength coach Dan John calls “punch the clock workouts.” Go to the gym with a plan and complete a quality training session that leaves you feeling good and not gassed. Eat well, sleep soundly, and repeat.

Keep it simple and well within your capacity to recover.
High intensity training routines are currently all the rage. The Tap Out, Insanity, Ripped in 30, P90x home fitness videos all operate at fairly high levels of exertion. It is difficult for anyone of average capacities to sustain that level of training on a consistent basis.

Competitive exercise protocols that involve performing “as many reps as possible” in a defined period of time are omnipresent on the internet. Competition creates a training environment that impedes good judgment. “Men will die for points” is a common quote that I hear in certain training circles.
As a physical therapist who treats exercise related injuries, I can state that pushing the exercise envelope and forty years plus is a dangerous combination. You may have another injury in you, but you may no longer have the capacity to fully recover from that injury.

In the long run, the guy or gal with the fewest “dings and dents” is the one who is able to remain in the fitness race. I like the idea of “user friendly” fitness activities. Training does not have to be complicated or overly intense. Get better at moving a weight or your body through three sets of eight, four sets of six, or two sets of twelve. Perform five or six exercises with your chosen set/repetition range. Take a long walk every day of the week. Consistency is King– eat, sleep, rest, and then repeat.

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

One of the best training tools is a set of all purpose bands ($25.00 from performbetter.com). These bands are a sturdy, dipped latex product made by Lifeline. They have two handles on one endLunge_Row and a loop system that makes them easy to anchor in either a closed door or around something stable and upright. The bands come in progressive resistance levels and can be integrated into many beneficial exercises. One of my favorite resistance band exercises is the posterior lunge and row.

I like exercise activities that produce a lot of benefit for the time invested in training. These are the big benefits of the posterior lunge and row:

Continue reading

In 2012, an international team of researchers and clinicians launched Too Fit to Fracture, an initiative aimed at synthesizing best evidence and developing recommendations for both exercise and physical activity for individuals with osteoporosis. In October of 2014, they released a booklet that is available through osteoporosis.ca on managing osteoporosis through exercise. Everyone should read this booklet and osteoporosis patients should use their suggestions on exercise. It brings clarity to an issue that is currently clouded with poor understanding and a lot of bad advice.

A valuable part of this book is the “do not do’s”. Any person with spinal changes secondary to osteoporosis needs to hear about avoiding the damaging effects of prolonged sitting. Many people consider Yoga and Pilates “gentle” fitness activities that are suitable for patients with osteoporosis. I have treated osteoporosismany osteoporosis patients with pain problems brought on by a well intentioned adventure into an inappropriate exercise class.

The Too Fit to Fracture researchers recommended that individuals with osteoporosis (with or without vertebral fractures) should engage in a multi-component exercise program that includes resistance training in combination with balance training. Balance train for ten to twenty minutes every day of the week and strength train for 30 to 45 minutes twice a week. Make sure your strength training teaches you how to move correctly and improves the endurance in your back muscles. If you have mild to moderate osteoporosis and you balance train and strength train first and foremost then spend the extra time on some cardio training. If you have been told you are at high risk for fracture, keep the cardio training at a lower intensity.

A lot of unproven and inappropriate fitness advice is published every day. We all need to consume good fitness information and not junk food. Take to the time to download the workbook and read it over. Twenty years from now your bones will thank me.

To access and download  the Too Fit to Fracture booklet, click on the link below:

http://www.osteoporosis.ca/osteoporosis-and-you/too-fit-to-fracture/

-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Categories