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Learn more about Rehab, Sports Medicine & Performance

“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” –John Wooden

Amy Warner, Jeff Tirrell, and I recently attended the three day Perform Better Summit in Chicago.  This gathering showcases presentations from experts in the fields of fitness, sports medicine, athletic training, nutrition, and rehabilitation.  All of these presenters work with clients and patients on a daily basis and, as is often the case, their “in the trenches” experience precedes the findings of research studies.  I attend the Summit every year and always walk away with new ideas and knowledge.  We present a brief review of some of the more memorable aspects of the presentations.

Training Athletes In GroupsIMG_1847

Mike Boyle, Body By Boyle Performance Centers and Strength Coach for the Boston Red Sox

  • Know and be able to teach a progression and, more importantly, a regression of every exercise.
  • Don’t put load on top of poor movement.  If the movement looks bad you must fix it before you load it.
  • If you are not foam rolling your athletes, you are a dumbass!
  • Power training is essential if you train older adults, but you must choose the appropriate method.  Know the risk / benefit ratio of your power activity selection.
  • The purpose of the program is to reduce injuries and improve performance.  We are not trying to create power lifters, Olympic lifters, bodybuilders, or strongmen.  We are trying to create athletes.  Strength training is simply a means to an end.

The Best Functional Exercises In the World

Gray Cook, MPT, OCS, CSCS, Co-Founder of the Functional Movement Screen

We need functional exercise because we erode our environment to make life easier:

  • Posture fails because we slouch in chairs.
  • Endurance falters because we simply do more of it instead of performing it better.
  • Coordination dissipates because we train in a supported state or, worse, sitting down.
  • Strength is blunted as we perform all tasks with exterior support and easy access handles.

Posture/Balance/Alignment/Coordination

1. Balance beam

2. Bottoms up kettlebell activities

3. Farmers carry

4. Indian club exercises

5. Jump rope

6. Bear crawl—especially uphill

7. Turkish Get Up

8. Overhead carries

Strength/Endurance/Power/Speed

1. Push ups

2. Pull ups

3. Deadlifts

4. Push press

5. Sprints

6. Agility work—physical jigsaw puzzle

Cracking the Coordination Code: Pre Pubescent Athletes

Brett Klika, CSCS, Creator of Spiderfitkids

  • Coordination is how the brain synchronizes and controls movements through muscular activation. It is a set of physical skills that can be practiced, learned and improved.
  • Neural plasticity is at a high point between ages six and twelve.
  • PAWs–Preferential Adaptation Windows– are age phases in which certain coordinative skills can be preferentially developed.
  • Accelerated periods of brain maturation: 15-24 months, 6-8years, 10-12 years, 18 years.
  • If you take children and enhance their movement efficiency and performance, then you increase the likelihood of participation, reduce the propensity to become obese, and make injury less of a concern.

How To Develop Agile Strength

Michol Dalcourt, University of Alberta Exercise Physiologist, Founder and Director of the Institute of Motion, Creator of the Vipr

  • The shape and stability of the human body is produced by the myofascia systems that are woven through the body.
  • The layers of fascia are connected to the nerves that transmit signals of tensile stress and compression that occur as we move.
  • Muscles rely on nerve sensitivity and nerves rely on the fascial sensitivity.
  • Agile strength involves loading and unloading the myofascial lines is a three dimensional activity that trains the muscles, nerves and fascial systems to work together as a team.
  • Athletic activities are multiplanar and three dimensional, but most training is uniplanar and one dimensional.
  • Get better at creating better fascia-nerve-muscle communication and you become better at all activities.  Not just weight room strong but farm boy strong.

Paleo, Vegan, Intermittent Fasting: What’s the Best Diet?

Dr. John Berardi, PhD, CSCS, Founder of Precision Nutrition–my favorite source for nutrition information

  • There’s no such thing as a universal best diet.
  • Most popular diets have a lot in common.
  • Coaches should never lock into a single philosophy.
  • Habit-based coaching is better than diet-based coaching.
  • Proper nutritional coaching involves formulating a plan based on your needs, what you want to accomplish, how you live, and what is personally important.

-Michael O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

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