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Year 55 Scorecard

Fitness is a motivational mind game.  Setting achievable goals provides the ongoing positive reinforcement needed to keep at the fitness habit.  I no longer set as many performance goals.  As I get older (55), it is more difficult to get stronger, run faster, or jump higher.  I try to set attainable process goals.  I want to stay injury free, metabolically healthy, fight off postural deterioration, and train consistently throughout the year.  If I happen to lose some fat, get stronger or faster, it is a happy by product.  Every birthday, I do a fitness goal review and this is my year 55 fitness scorecard.

Two Hundred Training Sessions a Year
My goal is to get in 200 training sessions in a year.  I managed to fit in 212 sessions for the past year.  Setting specific attendance goals is critical.  In fitness, all of the significant long-term benefits happen when you show up on a consistent basis.

Maintain Proper Movement
This is how the downward spiral starts.  You lose some mobility in your lunge, squat, or overhead reach.  Limited mobility means you no longer can work the muscles through a full functional range of motion.  The muscles move less, atrophy takes hold, and the metabolism slows.  You gain fat more readily, and because you are weaker and heavier, you move less.  Less total movement activity leads to even less mobility.  Less muscle mass leads to far less stored glycogen and insulin sensitivity suffers.  Insulin sensitivity problems lead to diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome……. You get the idea.  Mobility is a key component to remaining injury free and staying metabolically healthy.  This past year finds me better in all lunge patterns, and my sprint strides no longer look like Barry Sanders on one side and Colonel Sanders on the other.

Better Single Leg Motor Control
This has been the biggest challenge and the biggest change.  My single leg balance is better and the strength in my hips and lower back has improved.  Single leg training becomes more important as you get older or have a history of injuries.  I enjoy the variety that single leg programming brings to my training.

Power Up
In 2012, I did much more power type training.  In athletics and daily survival, power is more important than strength.  As we get older, the ability to fire muscles rapidly recedes.  The last decade of research studies have shown that this trend is reversible.  My scores in the medicine ball throw and the standing long jump both improved.  I believe the drills that helped the most were the hurdle jumps and kettlebell swings.  I became more proficient in both of these exercises.  My vertical leap did not get any better, but it did not get any worse.

No Injuries
I started with a sore shoulder, but some dedicated mobility work and rehab training set that straight.  I made it through the rest of the year with no dings or dents.

No Medications
This is a goal of mine every year.  I consider it a fitness victory if I am able to go another year and not have to take a blood pressure pill, statin drug, or an anti-inflammatory. I can think of no better fitness goal than being able to eliminate medications because your health is better.

Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., O.C.S., C.S.C.S.

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