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Motrin Mayhem

More Research On Effects of Exercise and NSAID Medications

Millions of Americans take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) every day.  Many use these over the counter drugs to reduce the discomfort / pain of fitness activities.  Big Pharma marketing makes the use of these chemicals look harmless.  In the commercial, the lady pops three pills and glides effortlessly through her run.  The basketball player takes his gel capsules and bounds through the game with his buddies.  Most of us view these drugs as harmless and beneficial.  Ongoing studies have shown that the use of NSAIDs as a pre-exercise activity preparation can limit your muscle recovery and damage your internal organs.  A recent New York Times *article by Gretchen Reynolds should scare everyone away from medicating with NSAIDs prior to a training session.

Exercise induced inflammation is a critical biochemical process that helps us recover from a bout of training. You do not get fitter while training, you get fitter during recovery from a bout of exercise.  The inflammatory biochemicals that make you sore and stiff after a vigorous exercise session are called prostaglandins.  NSAIDs work by interrupting the chemical assembly line that makes various prostaglandins.  No prostaglandin production means you have no delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), so you feel better.  Prostaglandins are the chemical signal that tells your muscle cells to get busy repairing and reinforcing your skeletal muscle cells.  No prostaglandins, no beneficial adaptation during recovery.  Take a NSAID before training and it’s like you never exercised at all.

Prostaglandin production creates vasodilation– more blood can get where it needs to go during a session of exercise.  The studies cited in the New York Times article have demonstrated that inhibited prostaglandin production creates diminished blood flow to your kidneys.  Limited kidney function dramatically blunts progress toward all fitness goals.   It is very difficult to run further, get stronger, or become leaner while undergoing dialysis.

Take the time to read the article by Gretchen Reynolds and rethink that pre-exercise NSAID protocol. You can view the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/05/well/move/bring-on-the-exercise-hold-the-painkillers.html?

*Bring On the Exercise, Hold the Painkillers, Gretchen Reynolds, New York Times, July 5, 2017

Barbara O’Hara, RPh.

Slant and Pant

HIIT Methods: Incline Treadmill Walking

Fitness centers present the client with an endless array of cardio training entertainment.  You can spin a bike, wheel around on an elliptical, run on a treadmill, row, ski,…  My recommendation is that we all start performing more incline treadmill walking intervals.  There are three big benefits you get from incline treadmill intervals that you do not get from any of the other cardio contraptions.

Single leg stance stability is a skill we all need to keep in our fitness programs.  Our independence and well-being is based upon being able to repeatedly balance, load, and then drive forward off a single leg.  Since we are all sitting more, we need to make an effort to practice the elaborate leg to leg “game of catch” that happens when we walk.  It is a sad fact that most of the more popular training devices in the gym have made exercise easier by eliminating the single leg stability demand.

Hip extension is the movement of your thigh bone (femur) behind your body.  Hip extension keeps your hamstring and gluteal muscles strong and responsive.  Well functioning hamstrings and gluteals keep your knees and lower back healthy and happy.  In the age of perpetual sitting and very little squatting and sprinting, hip extension has become a lost movement pattern.  Improving hip extension strength should be part of every training session.

Walking on an incline reboots the postural reflexes that hold us tight and tall.   Prolonged sitting, improper training, and weakness shuts down the team of muscles that keep our spine stable and upright.  As fatigue sets in, you can slouch over on a bike, slump onto the elliptical, or fold into a rower and continue to exercise.  If you lose your posture on the incline treadmill walk, you slide down the belt.  Many fitness clients report this is the hardest part of an incline treadmill session–their muscles in the middle fatigue before their legs.

Finding your initial incline and walking pace will be a trial and error endeavor.  My suggestion is that you start easy.  I find most newbies to incline treadmill intervals do well with a 5% incline and a 3.5 mph pace.  Incline treadmill training makes you stronger in all of the most neglected places.  Many people report they are able to significantly advance incline and speed with four months of dedicated training.  For the best results, frequently vary the intervals that you perform.  These are some of the sessions I have found work well for fitness clients.

90 seconds on / 45 seconds off

Walk for ninety seconds.  Step off the treadmill and rest for forty five seconds and repeat for three to six intervals.  The two to one work / rest ratio works well for nearly all fitness clients that are new to incline treadmill walking.

Quarter Mile Repeats

Get a stopwatch and track your performance on this interval session.  Set the treadmill speed and incline.  Walk ¼ of a mile.  Rest as needed and then repeat.  Perform four ¼ mile incline walks.  Record your time to complete all four ¼ mile walks.  I find this to be a good test of cardiorespiratory recovery capacity.  Work toward a faster performance.

10 seconds on / 10 seconds off x 10

This comes directly from Dr. Gibalas research on HIIT.  This protocol has been shown to be as or more effective at improving insulin sensitivity and cardiorespiratory capacity than longer training sessions.  Set the treadmill at a slightly higher incline.  Walk ten seconds and then step off and rest for ten seconds.  Perform ten of these ten second intervals.

2/10th, 3/10th, 5/10th Mile Interval Session

Get a stopwatch and track your performance on this interval session.  Set the treadmill speed and incline.  Walk 2/10th of a mile.  Rest as needed and then perform 3/10th of a mile.  Rest as needed and then perform 5/10th of a mile.  Record your time to complete all three intervals.   As you get stronger your times will improve.

For more information on the many benefits of HIIT read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Hills Make It Happen

HIIT Methods: Hill Sprints

Hills sprints are an amazingly effective method of improving fitness and keeping the lower extremities strong.  Sprinting up a hill reduces impact on the joints, improves running mechanics, creates a profound metabolic disruption, and your training session is over in twelve minutes.  Walter Peyton was a huge believer in hill sprints and no one could argue with his results.

Hill sprints are safer than flat surface sprints because the ground rises up to meet the foot.  Maximal lower limb speed and impact is reduced when you sprint up a hill.  Hill sprints make you lean forward into the posture of acceleration.  In order to produce more of the force that lifts the body up the hill, the athlete must pump the arms and drive back through the hips.  Hill sprints are arguably one of the most functional training activities you can perform.

Hill sprints are not for everyone.  They are not appropriate for the physically deconditioned population.  If you have a history of lower extremity orthopedic issues, you want to use another, less aggressive form of HIIT.  Hill sprints take some discipline to complete.  They are not the same as running uphill on an inclined treadmill.  I would argue that hill sprints are the most effective method of disrupting physiological homeostasis–you will get leaner and fitter faster.

The ideal hill is a five to seven percent grade and 100 to 150 yards long.  Most of the hill sprints you will perform are for distances sixty yards or less.  Listed below are some of my favorite hill sprint routines.

20 Yard Hill Sprints

Sprint up the hill for twenty yards.  Walk back down and rest.  Beginners start with three sprints and work your way up to eight sprints.

20 – 40 – 60 – 40 – 20 Yard Hill Sprints

Sprint 20 yards and then rest, 40 yards, rest, 60 yards, rest 40 yards, rest, 20 yards and you are finished.  Recover sufficiently so the next hill sprint does not suffer a breakdown in performance.

40 Yard Hill Sprints

Warm up and perform a 40 yard hill sprint at 80% of full effort.  Walk back down the hill and then perform another 40 yard hill sprint at 85% full effort.  Perform the next three hill sprints at 90-95% full effort.  Five good sprints are all you need.

Watch Mike explain hill sprinting on his favorite hill: https://youtu.be/AHJjmT87g7g

For more information on the many benefits of HIIT read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Spinning Wheel

HIIT Methods: Air Assault Dual Action Bike

The Air Assault dual action bike is a challenging metabolic disrupting machine.   For older fitness clients, heavier folks, and those of us with legs that are less tolerant of impact, the Air Assault improves cardio-respiratory capacity and minimizes joint stress.  If you are seeking an intense training experience, look no further than the Air Assault bike.

The number two reason people give for not exercising is limited time–lack of results is number one.  The Air Assault solves both of these problems.  Training sessions on the Air Assault are brief and very effective.

Set your seat for height and reach so at the bottom of the pedal stroke, the knee is bent about 20 degrees.  The arms should not fully extend at the elbows.  The bike is simple– increase the pedal speed and you push a greater volume of air.  Go slow—less resistance.  Go fast—more resistance.  Keep a tall posture to effectively drive with the arms and assist the legs.  I have outlined four of my favorite HIIT Air Assault training routines.  As usual, remember to perform a movement preparation warm up before launching into a HIIT session.

30 seconds on / 30 seconds off

Ride at an exertion level of 7/10 (1 is a stroll and 10 is sprinting away from a lion) for 30 seconds and then pedal slowly at a 1/10 exertion level for 30 seconds.  Repeat the cycle for ten intervals.  You are done in ten minutes.

45 seconds on / 15 seconds off

Ride at an exertion level of 7/10 (1 is a stroll and 10 is swimming to escape the alligator) for 45 seconds and then pedal slowly for at a 1/10 exertion level for 30 seconds.  Repeat the cycle for five intervals.  This workout takes five minutes.

Tabata Protocol

Twenty seconds on at an exertion level of 9/10 followed by ten seconds off at 1/10.  Repeat eight times.  This format is built right into the Air Assault bike timer.  Do not get discouraged if you have to stop well before completing eight intervals.  Work your way up to completing all four minutes of the session.

1.5, 1.0, 0.5 Mile Intervals

Ride for one and half miles and then rest 90 seconds.  Ride for one mile and rest for 45 seconds.  Ride for a half mile.  Record you overall time.

View Mike’s video on the assault bike: https://youtu.be/8Y3rmX2cF3s

For more information on the many benefits of HIIT read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Pushing For Performance

HIIT Methods: Sled Training

A good high intensity interval training (HIIT) session creates a disturbance of metabolic homeostasis while minimizing stress on the joints and / or compression of the spine.  Pushing a sled meets both of those goals.  Sled sessions are time efficient, and they have the added benefits of improving leg strength, core stability, and they make you better at nearly every daily challenge.  A well designed HIIT sled training protocol allows you to assess performance and track progress.  Presented below are four of my most frequently prescribed sled HIIT protocols.   Ditch the elliptical, cancel your Zumba sessions, and for the next month, give these a try.

I cannot tell you how much weight to use on the sled.  In general, men can start with bodyweight and women with half to two thirds bodyweight loads.  You will quickly learn if you have too much or too little on the sled.  Any progressive gym will have several sleds and plenty of open space.  The trainers at Fenton Fitness can get you started.

30 / 30 Protocol: Place a stopwatch so it is visible on the sled.  The load on the sled should create a thirty second interval exertion rating that feels “easy”.  Push the sled for thirty seconds and then rest for 30 seconds.  Perform eight intervals.

10 – 20 – 30 – 10 – 20 – 30 – 10 – 20 – 30 Yard Interval: Load your sled and start the timer.  Push the sled for 10 yards and rest twenty seconds.  Push the sled 20 yards and rest twenty seconds.  Push the sled 30 yards and rest twenty seconds.  Repeat 10, 20, and 30 yards two more times.   Finish all of the intervals and you will have covered 180 yards.  Record your time.

60 – 30 – 15 Yard Interval: Be careful that you do not use too much load for this HIIT sled session.  Push the sled 60 yards.  Rest thirty seconds.  Push the sled 30 yards.  Rest thirty seconds.  Push the sled 15 yards.  Record your time.

15 Yards Times Ten: Use a load on the sled that allows you to move at a fairly steady pace.  Think racehorse, not plow horse.  Place a stopwatch so it is visible on the sled.   Start the timer and push the sled fifteen yards.  Rest ten seconds and then push another fifteen yard push.  Perform ten, fifteen yard intervals.  Record your time.

View Mike’s video on sled training here: https://youtu.be/PfOccHMmzF4

For more information on the many benefits of high intensity interval training, read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Training Your Inner Fireman

HIIT Methods: Jacob’s Ladder

At one time, we could all crawl and we did it very well.  An infant develops the strength and coordination necessary to stand upright and walk by crawling.  The reciprocal arm/leg crawl pattern of the Jacob’s Ladder helps restore joint stability, coordination, and balance.  All of us have established neural pathways for crawling.  They are just cluttered up and inhibited by prior injuries, poor posture, bad training habits, and a sedentary lifestyle.  Performing some Jacob’s Ladder intervals will bring those pathways back to life.

The Jacob’s Ladder is a 40 degree inclined total body conditioning activity.  The ladder is self-propelled, and your position on the ladder sets the pace of the climb.  Wrap the belt around your waist with the emblem set over the side of your right hip.  Adjust the white section of the strap so that it matches your height.  Step onto the ladder and start climbing.  Initially, place the hands on the side rails and get use to climbing with just the legs.  Once you get comfortable with the stride pattern, progress to using the hands on the rungs.  Work on improving your coordination and form during the initial Jacob’s Ladder sessions.  When you are ready to stop, simply ride the ladder to the bottom and the ladder will stop.  Listed below are some of the HIIT sessions that work well with the Jacobs Ladder.

Five Climbs
Pick a distance, 100-200 feet works well for most fitness clients.  Start the stopwatch and climb 100-200 feet and  then rest.  Repeat four more times and record your time to complete five climbs of 100-200 feet.

50 feet / 20 seconds rest
Climb fifty feet at a fast pace.  Rest twenty seconds and repeat.  Repeat for a total of six intervals.

Ladder Ladders  
This routine will help you develop better endurance.  Climb 100 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 200 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 300 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 400 feet and rest 60 seconds.  Climb 500 feet and rest 60 seconds.  If you feel strong enough, climb back down; 400-300-200-100 feet.

Save My Baby Sprints
You are the fireman.  The building is on fire and the lady with the baby is at the window of the high rise.  Hold onto the side rails and sprint up to that baby in the window 200 feet up.  Rest 30 seconds and then go get another baby.  Your job is to save four babies.

View video of Mike on the Jacob’s Ladder here: https://youtu.be/rqYz0tmPIc8

For more information on the many benefits of high intensity interval training, read the The One Minute Workout by Dr. Martin Gibala.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Training Modifications That Help With Your Medication

Statin medications are amazingly effective at lowering blood lipids and have, undoubtedly, lengthened lives.  More doctors are recommending their patients start on these drugs at younger ages.  For a long time, we have known that a common side effect of cholesterol lowering statin drugs is severe muscle soreness after exercise.  Recent research on animal models has demonstrated that statin medications inhibit the beneficial muscle adaptations that occur with exercise.  If you are taking a statin drug, take the time to read Gretchen Reynolds’s interesting article in The New York Times, “A Fitness Downside to Statin Drugs?”  Over the years, I have found certain exercise modifications help reduce the muscle soreness symptoms in physical therapy and fitness clients who are taking statins.  The following recommendations may work for you.

Delayed onset muscle soreness is more pronounced with two types of training:  eccentric type muscle contractions (the muscle lengthens against resistance) and deceleration activities (landing from a jump, hop, or stride).  I have found that managing eccentric muscle contractions and reducing deceleration activity allows clients taking statins the ability to perform beneficial training with less discomfort.

Manage Eccentric Muscle Contractions

Eccentric contractions (the muscle lengthens against resistance) create more micro trauma to the muscle fibers, and it takes longer to recover from a bout of training that involves more eccentric repetitions.  Controlled pace, bodybuilding type muscle isolation training delivers eccentric loading in an effort to stimulate a hypertrophy response in the muscle.

Performing isometric strength training (no movement of the joints) completely eliminates the eccentric portion of an exercise.  Sled pulling and pushing has no eccentric component and many statin medicated fitness clients say this fairly intense fitness activity is well tolerated.  A suspension trainer works well to preferentially unload the eccentric portion of a squat or lunge movement pattern.  Strength training with resistance tubing creates an accommodated force curve that reduces eccentric loading of the muscles.  At FFAC, we have a Surge 360 that is a concentric only device that works all directions of a push or pull with no eccentric muscle stress.  A good fitness coach can find multiple ways to reduce the eccentric involvement of an exercise activity.

Reduce Impact

Impact activities produce high intensity, eccentric muscle contractions.  Land from a jump off a box and your quadriceps, hamstrings, and gluteal muscles must create a quick, coordinated contraction that slows your interaction with gravity.  Deceleration eccentric exercises create more muscle damage and repeated deceleration events are notorious for creating higher levels of delayed onset muscle soreness.

If you want to perform “cardio exercise,” choose the elliptical, Ski Erg, or one of the many types of bikes.  If you possess the mobility, use a Concept 2 rower.  Stay away from the impact of treadmill running and avoid jumping rope, jumping jacks, and any activity that involves both feet leaving the ground.  Medicine ball throws can be performed with minimal impact and produce an excellent muscular and neurological training response.  Avoid box jumps, Olympic lifts, and any other activity that creates an impact on your body.

Talk to Your Doctor

I have worked with many people who had a discussion with their doctor and a simple alteration of their statin medication resulted in far fewer side effects.  I am always surprised by how often patients are reluctant to report their symptoms of severe muscle soreness to their physician.

So those are the hints that have come from years of my work with physical therapy patients and fitness clients.  Stay off the wheel and stay healthy.

Read the NY Times article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/04/well/move/a-fitness-downside-to-statin-drugs.html

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

Three Gifts I Would Give And Three I Would Take Away

Santa Gives You Gluteal Activation
You need a responsive and strong set of butt muscles to function at optimal levels. Many gym goers have gluteal muscles that are neurologically disconnected.  The term physical therapists and strength coaches use is “gluteal amnesia.”  Our sedentary lifestyle involves very little of the glute recruiting sprinting, deep squatting, and climbing that activates the butt muscles.  We mistreat our gluteal muscles with hours of compressive sitting and little in the way of full range hip movement.  Most fitness clients are in need of some intensive gluteal training.  The hip lift is a simple exercise activity that produces a superior response.  See the attached video for a demonstration.

Scrooge the Lumbar Spine Flexion
Drop the sit ups, stop doing crunches, ditch the glute ham developer sit ups, and forgo the toes to bar competitions.  Father time, gravity, and the stress of prolonged sitting are already bending our lumbar spines forward all day long.  The last thing you need to do is accelerate degenerative breakdown of the lumbar segments with more repetitions of spine flexion.  Please forget about isolating abdominal muscles.  Instead learn how to control the team of muscles that hold the lumbar spine stable.  It is a neural event that is worthy of all your efforts.

Santa Gives You Medicine Ball Throws
medballLife is an up tempo game.  What you do in the gym is reflected in how well you can move during activities of daily living.  If you continually exercise at slow tempos you will get better at moving slowly.  The capacity to decelerate a fall requires fast reactions.  Gracefully traveling up the stairs and getting out of the car are only improved with exercise that enhances power and speed of movement.  Medicine ball throws are the easiest way to improve power.  Medicine ball throws can be scaled to all fitness levels and are safe as long as you use a properly sized and weighted ball.  The large, soft Dynamax balls are a good choice for beginners.  They rebound well off of the block walls in the gym and are easy to catch.  Do not overload your medicine ball throws, a two to eight pound ball is best for most gym goers.  Get with one of the trainers for instruction on adding medicine ball throws to your training program.

Scrooge Sitting Down in the Gym
Movement happens in an upright, standing position.  “Seated exercise” is an oxymoron.  If you want to improve how your body functions, you must stand up and defy gravity. Every athletic endeavor is performed in a standing position. Seated exercise reinforces poor postural habits and diminishes your capacity to move.  I call it the “illusion of exercise” and it will always be highly visible in commercial gyms because it is easy to sell.

Santa Gives You Four-Point Training
Crawling is the neurological training tool an infant uses to develop the capacity to stand and walk.  It is the pathway to better motor control and less pain.  Nearly every physical therapy patient and most fitness clients benefit from a healthy dose of four-point position exercise.  In your fitness program, reinforce the patterns of spinal stability and reboot the postural reflexes with some horse stance horizontal, crawling, and Jacobs Ladder training.   Four-point training can be scaled to any fitness level.  Watch the attached video for some examples.

Scrooge Elliptical Training
I know you love the elliptical.  It is the no impact, cardio darling of the gym but it should be used as a fitness dessert and not a main course.  Elliptical training has multiple drawbacks.  Ergonomically, it is a one size for everyone apparatus that does not work well for taller or shorter people.  When you walk or run, you improve the important skill of stabilizing your body over one leg.  An elliptical keeps both feet stapled to the machine and deadens any neural enhancement of balance or single leg stability.  Hip extension keeps our back healthy and our body athletic.  Maintaining or improving hip extension should be part of every training session.  There is no hip extension produced when you train on an elliptical.  Many people maintain a flexed spine when they use an elliptical.  Sitting produces the flexed forward spine we all need to work against in our fitness programs.  The repetitive use of the shoulder girdle is a frequent generator of referrals to physical therapy for head and neck pain.  Metabolic adaptation to elliptical training happens fairly quickly.  In January, a 30 minute session burns 330 calories, but by June, your body becomes more efficient and that same routine creates only a 240 calorie deficit.  The low impact, reduced weight bearing nature of an elliptical makes it a poor choice in your fight against osteoporosis.

I am happy when people are more active.  Patients and fitness clients love the elliptical and they believe it helps.  Use that belief to keep you motivated and training.  I just want everyone to manage the drawbacks of this type of training.  Injured people always say “Why didn’t someone tell me?”  Before you jump on the elliptical, take ten minutes and improve your core stability and hip function with some four-point exercises and hip lifts.  Learn how to throw a medicine ball and stay standing through the rest of your training program.  Next Christmas you will thank me.

Merry Christmas and a Humbug to you.

See video of Mike in the gym demonstrating these exercises here: https://youtu.be/H0my94BPHNQ

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Health and Ergonomic Assist Gift That Get Used

I have some fitness and health promoting ergonomic gift recommendations for the 2016 holiday season.  I have used all of these products and have been happy with the results.  Most can be purchased on line and this allows you to devote more time to a fitness program.  In the tradition of all great holiday shoppers, I like to get one for me and another to give.

Personal Training
Giving a healthy holiday gift is easy at Fenton Fitness and Athletic Center.  Our Christmas gift certificates can be used for any of the training programs at the club.  Team training classes and personal training packages make great gifts.  Numerous studies have shown that individuals who utilize professional guidance are more successful in reaching fitness goals.  No one performs exercises correctly after only one training session.  You need ongoing evaluation and progression on proper exercise performance.  Older and physically limited individuals need the assistance of a trainer more than any other group.  Our team of trainers and physical therapists can help everyone reach their fitness goals.

Jungle Gym XT Suspension Trainer
The creation of user-friendly suspension trainers set off a mini revolution in fitness.  If you go into a fitness center and they do not have multiple suspension trainers readily available, you need to find a new gym.  The Lifeline Jungle Gym XT is an elegantly simple and extremely versatile device that should be a part of every home gym.  Suspension trainer exercises can be scaled to any level of fitness and are a valuable weapon in our fight against age, injury, and occupational stress.  At $90.00, the Jungle Gym XT wins the price war and, in my experience, it has worked well in both commercial and clinical conditions.

Aerocart by Worx
worx-toolsGardening and landscaping activities are responsible for many of the referrals to physical therapy.  The afflicted gardener has tweaked a lower back or strained a knee after hoisting a heavy object or spending too much time slumped over the flowerbeds.  A single ergonomic tool can help remedy both of those problems.  The Aerocart from Worx is a gardener’s Swiss Army Knife.  It functions as a lightweight wheelbarrow, handcart, rock lifter, snow plow, pull wagon, and gardening stool.   The Aerocart costs $140 and you can get a snow plow- my favorite- and the wagon attachments for another $100.  I have used this tool to push snow, haul firewood, rearrange rocks, and move soil.  The fact that the bucket does not hold mega volume prevents a user from overloading his spine.  This device will extend the gardening career of the avid weed puller on your Christmas list.

All Purpose Bands From Perform Better
One of the best strength training devices is a set of the All Purpose Bands.  These bands are sturdy dipped latex products made by Lifeline.  They have two handles on one end and a loop system that makes them easy to anchor in either a closed door or around a stable upright device.  All Purpose Bands can be used in a home gym set up, but my suggestion is that you anchor a set in a door at work and fight off the debilitating stress of all day sitting with some daily rowing, hip hinging, and scapula retraction exercises.  A set of All Purpose Bands costs $25.00, and as your strength improves, you can purchase the next level of resistance in the series (light—purple, pink, orange, yellow, blue, black—strong) from performbetter.com.

Varidesk Conversion Desk
standing-desk-pro-plus-36_main-10a88d7d8eef66cbc9309ff1100d93b41Human physiology was designed to function under the physical demands of standing and walking.  Much of the now rampant obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome can be linked to our species’ sudden fall into sustained sitting.  The health statistics on the damaging effects of sustained sitting are distressing.

I can think of no better health-promoting gift for a loved one than a sit to stand conversion desk.  The product I have the most experience with is the Varidesk.  It comes pre-assembled and has functioned flawlessly.  It allows the user to sit for some portion of the day and gradually transition to greater time in the standing position.  The Varidesk comes in a variety of sizes / set ups and costs $375 to $550.

My First Stand Up from Jaswig
The New York Times recently reprinted an article by Jane Brody, “Posture Affects Standing, and Not Just the Physical Kind.”  In the article, Ms. Brody talks about how poor posture creates problems across multiple areas of physical and mental well-being.  The respiratory, digestive, emotional, and neurological systems are all impacted by postural restrictions.  You are even more likely to be a victim of crime if you have a slumped over posture.  So how do you develop better posture?

My suggestion is to start with early intervention in the form of a standing workstation.  The Belgian company Jaswig, has produced a standing desk for children.  As the child grows, this adjustable wood desk travels with him.  In our physical therapy clinics, we are seeing younger people with head, neck, and upper back pain problems related to poor posture.  Mobile phones, laptops, tablets, and all the other “devices” are being used at earlier ages leading to the postural breakdown that usually occurs in later years of life.   The My First Stand Up workstation from Jaswig (cost $379) is the early intervention answer.

PowerBlock Adjustable Dumbbell Set
Dumbbell training is one of the most effective forms of exercise.  The big limitation of dumbbell training is the cost of buying a series of varying dumbbell weights and the space required to store 10 – 15 sets.  The PowerBlock company has solved this problem.  A set of PowerBlocks occupies less than three square feet of your home and, depending on the size you purchase, replaces 10 – 25 pairs of traditional dumbbells.  I have put some heavy use on a set of PowerBlocks that I purchased in 1992.  They have functioned flawlessly and show minimal wear.  A beginner set of PowerBlocks (5-40 pounds) costs from $300 – $330 and you can add expansion sets as you get stronger.  My thirteen-year old self would have loved to get a set of PowerBlocks for Christmas.

Hyper Vest
Most people have busy lives and limited time to devote to fitness.  They want to get stronger, improve mobility, and maintain some degree of conditioning with minimal time commitment.  For those people, I have a suggestion: Buy a Hyper Vest Pro and get to work.

I have used the Hyper Vest Pro for many years and can vouch for its durability.  The comfort and overall function of the Hyper Vest Pro is impressive.  The side lacing system makes the fit superior to other weight vest products.  The individual weights are small and spread evenly over the front and back of the vest.  Ten pounds of small steel plates are standard with the Hyper Vest Pro.  I have found fitness clients do well with vest loads between five and twelve pounds.  At $160, the Hyper Vest Pro is more expensive than other products, but the first rate fit and comfort make it worth the money.  It is a great holiday present for the fitness fanatic on your shopping list.

Roller
gridx_matrix1If you consistently exercise, one of the best things you can do to enhance recovery between sessions is perform foam rolling soft tissue work.  Combining foam roll work with mobility drills is the secret fitness ingredient that makes chronically tight individuals more flexible.  The older you are, the harder you work, and the more frequently you train, the more you will benefit from the foam roll.  I like the roller made by Trigger-Point (tptherapy.com).  They come as a short, 13 inch version for $40.00 or the longer, 26 inch roller for $65.00.

-Michael S. O’Hara, P.T., OCS, CSCS

PDFIn this month’s issue, Mike O’Hara discusses hypermobile joints and exercise, 4 steps to fitness success are given, and information on how to stop back pain from disturbing sleep is presented.  Check out page three for a description of the latest class offered at Fenton Fitness– Suspension Shred.

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