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Body Parts

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Snatch

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Snatch.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/TrOhhKLIpqA.

The Hang Snatch, like the Hang Clean, is a better, easier option to learn than the full Snatch or Power Snatch.  Again, you start from the standing position.  We teach the Hang Snatch with a Hang Clean grip.  The traditional grip of the Snatch is much wider and places much more stress on the shoulders.  It is done to reduce the distance the bar must travel so you can increase the load you are able to use.  If you are not competing in Weightlifting, however, this doesn’t matter.  Once you are ready for the Hang Snatch and have the required shoulder mobility (can you touch your fingers behind your back?), it is the best power movement out there. The lighter loads used on this exercise compared to the Hang Clean make it an even friendlier exercise on your spine and the longer bar path requires more power output.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Hang Clean

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Hang Clean.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do.  See the video here: https://youtu.be/KupitKep6Lk

The problem with the traditional Clean and Power Clean is that many people have trouble getting into a good position to start the movement.  The Hang Clean eliminates this problem by starting from the standing position.  It only requires a small amount of hip movement, yet still produces a great deal of power.  A good goal for your hang clean is to do the same amount of weight as your 1 rep max bench press.  If you can’t get there, you need more cleans and less bench work.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Push Press

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Push Press.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do.  See the video here: https://youtu.be/1pI4eb6lMYQ

The Push Press is a limited, less technical, portion of the Clean and Jerk weightlifting movement.  It’s a great alternative as it has been shown to increase power but is much simpler to teach.  As long as you possess adequate shoulder mobility, there is much less risk with this exercise.  If done properly, both the hips and shoulders produce a large amount of vertical force which has strong carryover to sports that require jumping and overhead activities (throwers, volleyball, etc.).

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Embrace The Hate

Being Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable

“I hate this one.”

“This exercise never gets easier.”

“I do this but I hate this.”

“You like to see me struggle”

These are all common statements from fitness clients and physical therapy patients.  They have complaints about certain exercise activities that are difficult, unsteady, aggravating, and just plain annoying.  The activities that provoke these responses usually involve getting up and down off the ground, single leg biased training, carrying a weight, and / or pushing a sled.

These comments are usually followed by—

“..but I know they are helping.”

“I don’t have that pain anymore.”

“My legs are so much stronger.”

“I hiked in the mountains with my grandchildren.”

To make progress in rehab and fitness, you need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable.  If your fitness regimen involves scented candles, soothing music, and nothing that makes you uneasy, then I doubt it has much value.  Training challenges that restore movement skills, improve strength, and add muscle mass will create some discomfort.  Developing the mindset that embraces the challenge makes all the difference.

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Plyo Push Ups

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Plyo Push Ups.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/C0A0dibCmqE

Plyo Push Ups are a great horizontal power exercise for the upper body that simultaneously improves core stability. Pushing has obvious carryover for most sports and tends to be more on the speed side of the power spectrum. It can be easily progressed by adding a weight vest (use caution while performing this exercise due to force on the wrists).

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Split Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Split Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. See video here: https://youtu.be/yahWPNE0C-k

Those who have worked up to Split Jumps know it is a tremendous power exercise.  It challenges balance and puts the individual in a split stance which has much more carryover to running and cutting on the athletic field.  Split Jumps can be increased in difficulty by adding load (DBs or KBs in the hands or a weight vest) or by elevating the back foot.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Wise Up Bone Head

Bicycle Helmets and Head Injuries

While on a much needed family vacation, Larry and his wife ventured off for a bicycle ride around the resort.  Larry is not sure what happened, but he woke up in the hospital with a severe wrist fracture and a concussion.  Larry was not wearing a helmet and his wife reported that he went over the handlebars during a low speed turn.  Surgical repair of the wrist and some therapy restored his ability to grip, lift, and carry, but his mental capacity has remained impaired since the fall.  He has been unable to return to work secondary to memory deficits and problems with planning.  Larry has difficulty remembering the names of his coworkers and neighbors.  His wife reports he is more emotional and that she cannot let him drive without a navigator to assist in the return home.  Every physical therapist has a number of these stories.

If you or your children ride a bike, take the time to read. Buckle Up a Helmet to Save a Life by Jane Brody in the October 23, 2017 issue of the New York Times.  Jane recounts her own helmet free tumble from a bicycle and the statistics on bicycle head injuries.

No helmet bike riders tell me they are “extra careful” and that they “stay off busy roads”.  They are assuming that people fall off bikes solely to due to pilot error.  Bike accidents happen because of bad roads, distracted car drivers, and more recently, other bike riders. People driving trucks, cars, and other bicycles are not looking for bicyclists.  They are on autopilot–listening to the radio, talking on the phone, and texting.  You need a helmet now more than ever.

As a physical therapist, I get to work with individuals who have suffered closed head injuries.  Nothing creates a more sudden and long lasting change in your world than an impact to your cranium.  It does not take that much in the way of force to permanently alter the way you move, think, react to stress, and function during the day.  If in the past you did not use a helmet because of the appearance, I urge you reconsider.  An eternity of cognitive impairment and an inability to find your way home should be more concerning than your bicycle style.

* New York Times, Buckle Up a Helmet to Save a Life, Jane Brody, October 23, 2017 issue.  Read the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/23/well/buckle-up-a-helmet-to-save-a-life.html?_r=0

Michael S. O’Hara, PT, OCS, CSCS

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Broad Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Broad Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/iAmz2kyOx-0.

Broad jumps are a great movement for developing horizontal power/force production. Traditional Olympic Lifts emphasize vertical force with little carryover to sprinting/jumping.  Broad jumps emphasize speed though loading them can be difficult.  However, if you wish to progress the exercise and you have good mechanics, add a weight vest with a load of 10-20% of your body weight.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Box Jumps

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise: Box Jumps.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/LV9DH157nrU.

Although named box jumps, this exercise should technically be called box landings.  The point of a box jump is to introduce jumping and landing mechanics without the impact and force absorption of the landing that can lead to injury in many individuals.  The goal here should be to jump and land, softly, in the same position.  Once mastered, a one leg hop progression can be added.  Lastly, a traditional jump or hop can be used since your body will be ready to properly absorb the force of the movement.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

Olympic Lifts–Do We Really Need Them?

Medicine Ball Rotational Throws

 

Over the last several years, Olympic lifting movements have made a comeback into many gyms.  The primary reason to use Olympic lifts is to improve/maximize power output, or Rate of Force Development (RFD); however, the general fitness population lacks the requisite mobility and stability to safely get into the required positions to perform these exercises.  Over the next several weeks, I will introduce thirteen exercises that you can use instead to maximize speed, power, and RFD with less risk of injury, less technical skill required, and more efficiency.  Today’s exercise is the Medicine Ball Rotational Throw.  Watch the video, give it a try, and let us know how you do. View the video here: https://youtu.be/HrbowSvJ9Ck.

This movement is one area where Med Balls trump traditional weightlifting movements.  While the Clean & Jerk and Snatch are very linear and bilateral (2 feet on the ground), the Med Ball Rotational Throw works on an often neglected rotational power component.  This is a must for golfers, and softball or baseball players.  All medicine ball movements tend to be much higher on the speed continuum of the power movements.

-Jeff Tirrell, CSCS, CFSC, Pn1

 

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